Networking (Where to start?)

MG79MG79 Member Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
Evening All,

I currently have my MCSA and interested in studying for some Networking certs.

I have little 'networking' knowledge and before my studies begin for CCNA (which is my 1st goal) is there any advice on other networking certs and / or books, before I attempt this?

Is CCNA to much for someone with little networking knowledge? Any advice much appreciated?

Ta

Comments

  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    CCNA is probably a good goal to set for yourself, at this point. A lot of the networking concepts you learned doing 70-291 will help you, especially subnetting and ip addressing. Take a look at the objectives for CCNA, decide if you want to do the 1-exam or 2-exam option, and see where you want to go from there. If you feel like the material is too difficult, or that you're missing some foundational concepts, check out CompTIA's Network+ certification.

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  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    You might want to start with the Network+ if you feel that shaky about your networking skills.

    However, you've obviously gone through 291 since you have your MCSA. How did you feel about the networking material in that exam? It's certainly nothing to scoff at. Moving on to the CCNA after that isn't too big of a leap.

    When you say "networking knowledge," are you referring to physical equipment and things like cabling? It just seems like you should have developed a solid foundation in networking as you progressed through the MCSA.

    [edit]
    This is what you get when you open up a bunch of threads in different tabs and don't respond right away... Slowhand sneaks in. Good answer SH :D
  • MG79MG79 Member Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I'm talking about physical 'hands on' with networking equipment, e.g configuring routers, switches...
    I undertand this is needed for CCNA.

    Subnetting etc.., I can do (when I'm writing it down etc..., not one for being able to run subnet calcualtions off the top of my head.....yet anyway.)

    Is it a good idea to get hold of a router also, for practising, and is there any specifics for this?

    I have the Network + book (Sybex)...Although a good few years old, so the objectives may have changed for updated technologies. I was going to do this at same time as my A+ but then. decided on MS certs.

    So Network +, then CCNA? sound a good start?

    Is there any specific setup I need at home in a lab enviroment?

    Thank you
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    dynamik wrote:
    This is what you get when you open up a bunch of threads in different tabs and don't respond right away... Slowhand sneaks in. Good answer SH :D
    Now, now. Just because I have nothing better to do on a Sunday than snipe the forums, doesn't make me sneaky. icon_lol.gif

    MG79, take a look at the CCNA FAQ page on this forum for some ideas on lab equipment. There are also countless posts on lab setups, equipment questions, etc.

    If I remember correctly, the bare-bones minimum for a quality CCNA lab should be something along the lines of one Catalyst 2924/2948 or 2950 switch and two 2600 (or 3600) series routers. Check out eBay for the equipment, or a vendor like CiscoKits.com. There's also emulation software, like Dynamips, if you can't lay down the money for routers. (This still requires real IOS software, but it enables you to emulate several routers on a decently-powerful computer.)

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  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Slowhand wrote:
    Now, now. Just because I have nothing better to do on a Sunday than snipe the forums, doesn't make me sneaky. icon_lol.gif

    Unless you're just saying that to make my lower my guard... icon_eek.gif

    I also want to add that the Network+ will not help you with any hands-on exercises involving configuring routers and switches. That's what the CCNA is for. I really think you can move on to the CCNA if you've mastered things such as subnetting, static routes, etc. from 291. I'd go through your book and see if you really feel like it's going to be worth your time. You can always just use your Network+ book as a reference for any time you get stuck too. You are allowed to use the study materials even if you aren't working on the certification ;)

    Hands-on is the best way to learn, and building your own lab is one of the best ways to get acclimated to the Cisco world. There are dozens of "home lab" threads in the CCNA forum. Read through some of those, and you'll quickly gain a better understanding of what's involved with that.
  • jbaellojbaello Member Posts: 1,192
    I just want to learn site to site VPN tunnelling, so I can setup my windoze replications icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif does CCNA teaches you this?
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    jbaello wrote:
    I just want to learn site to site VPN tunnelling, so I can setup my windoze replications icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif does CCNA teaches you this?

    Nope got a little while on the Cisco track before you learn this. Why not just pick up a book and start learning now? I knew about VPNs before I ever even thought about getting a certification. If you want to learn something then just learn it don't wait for your certification to teach you!
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  • MG79MG79 Member Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I notice there are two routes to sitting the CCNA.

    One exam
    Two exams

    IS this just a matter of sitting one large exam, or spliting it over two exams?

    I take it coursework, objectives are the same, and you can chose to take either the one exam route or the two exam route?

    Maybe best move this to CCNA forum, as it's starting to go down that lane now! icon_smile.gif

    Thanks all
  • c0d3_w0lfc0d3_w0lf Member Posts: 117
    Yeah, the two exam route is basically splitting up the CCNA material into two separate exams. This will split up the material you need to learn, and it will also go a little more in depth into the areas each exam explores. (it'll also net you the CCENT cert, if I'm not mistaken). I took the single-exam route because that's what the course I took geared me towards, and also you only have to pay for one exam, instead of two. :)
    There is nothing that cannot be acheived.
  • KGhaleonKGhaleon Member Posts: 1,347
    Back when I took the original CCNA, I tried to pass the one exam since all my instructors had passed it. I failed it three times in a row. icon_lol.gif
    I would have passed had I taken the two exams...and would have been cheaper in the end.

    I definately suggest taking the two exams. The exam is nothing to scoff at despite being cisco entry-level.
    Present goals: MCAS, MCSA, 70-680
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