Military Future Questions and Civilian Jobs(Thanks in Advance)!

2

Comments

  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,308 ■■■■■■■■■□
    bellhead wrote: »
    you couldn't make E-5 even if you banging the admirals daughter, .

    What other incentive is there?
  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,308 ■■■■■■■■■□
    bellhead wrote: »
    Oh, also talking to a buddy still in the Navy he said the best job going out of any service is CTN which is Crypto Tech Network, they do all the networking, NOC, and deployment for the CT side of the house in the Navy, he said guys coming out of there are starting @ 100k because of their clearances and the work they do in the Navy.

    Sounds interesting.
  • motogpmanmotogpman Member Posts: 412
    No matter which service you go with, make sure to get everything in writing and since you stated the recruiter said you that you might be able to get jump school (Airborne!!!) out of the way, DO IT. (Airborne, Air Assault, Pathfinder, .....)

    Get as much as you can BEFORE you go to AIT or your unit if possible. Once you get to your unit, it all boils down to their budget and how many individuals they have already sent to the specific training. If you wait, you might not get some schools/training. Not to mention the benefit of those types of classes counting towards promotion points and the added benefit of wearing the badges/patches.

    The security clearance will help too, it will help save some associated costs for an employer if you are still currently holding a Sec clearance.

    BTW, all you gentlemen active or prior, thanks for the service and may God bless ya'll.
    -WIP- (70-294 and 297)

    Once MCSE 2k3 completed:

    WGU: BS in IT, Design/Management

    Finish MCITP:EA, CCNA, PMP by end of 2012

    After that, take a much needed vacation!!!!!
  • GamingCrazyGamingCrazy Member Posts: 113
    motogpman wrote: »
    No matter which service you go with, make sure to get everything in writing and since you stated the recruiter said you that you might be able to get jump school (Airborne!!!) out of the way, DO IT. (Airborne, Air Assault, Pathfinder, .....)

    Get as much as you can BEFORE you go to AIT or your unit if possible. Once you get to your unit, it all boils down to their budget and how many individuals they have already sent to the specific training. If you wait, you might not get some schools/training. Not to mention the benefit of those types of classes counting towards promotion points and the added benefit of wearing the badges/patches.

    The security clearance will help too, it will help save some associated costs for an employer if you are still currently holding a Sec clearance.

    BTW, all you gentlemen active or prior, thanks for the service and may God bless ya'll.

    I wanted to go to airborne, I was told it's pretty hard but he has seen people make it.

    Also, what's pathfinder? Thanks
  • GamingCrazyGamingCrazy Member Posts: 113
    notext wrote: »
    Not sure about guard/reserve but for active duty, you will receive basic allowance for housing at the rate of E-5 pay for the location of the school. You must be taking at least 12hrs per semester and you can't take 100% online courses.

    So for example. If when I get out I went to the University of Texas at Dallas(excellent MBA program), I would get $1137 a month to pay for my housing. If I went to Pepperdine University, Malibu CA, I would get $2051 per month.

    I am pretty sure guard does not receive the BAH.

    This is all under the Post 9/11 GI Bill. If I wanted to attend WGU and not take any offline courses, I could just move back to Dallas and use the Montgomery GI Bill that would pay me about just over $13,000 a year. That would leave me quite a bit after tuition to use towards housing.

    You can read more and calculate the stuff here New GI Bill - Calculate your benefits and more. You can also check out the VA site for more info.

    I'm pretty sure we don't recieve BAH because we are not active, although we recieve 529 for exspenses along with the monthly paycheck.

    25N is ranks at 350 Points Systme (I don't know what that means)

    Although, I was told it has a very fast promotion rate.

    Thanks for the help guys
  • wastedtimewastedtime Member Posts: 586 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I can see you are pretty motivated about doing this.

    Airborne seems completely reasonable, just make sure you get it in writing on your enlistment paperwork.

    I don't know a lot about pathfinder but I can tell you the only ones I have seen with it have been in a combat MOS and were SSG or better. I know it has to do with planing and managing a jump so it probably isn't something a junior enlisted(grades E1-E4) would be doing any ways.

    Not sure about the National Guard as I have heard that there promotion system is a bit different. For semi-centralized promotions (SGT, and SSG) though is done on a points system with the max attainable points at 800. The areas that count toward points are PT/marksmanship, awards, Commander's evaluation, military training, civilian education, and the board. The minimum points for promotion to SGT/E5 is 350. The reason it is probably so low right now is due to some of the military re-alignment that has been going on the past few years and how new that MOS is. That MOS came about in 2005 so it isn't quite 5 years old.

    Just a note: If you come in I would recommend you have the mind set that after you complete Initial Entry Training (IET) that you will deploy. If you don't deploy then it won't be nothing but a relief, but on the other hand if you do it could hurt your motivation.
  • BokehBokeh Member Posts: 1,636 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Just remember, even though you have a written contract, it doesn't mean squat. Myself, and others I have had the fortune (or misfortune how ever you wish to look at it) had contracts, guaranteed jobs, etc. Get down to basic, and in the middle get called in and told we can't get you that school - classes canceled, needs changed, etc. This happened to me in the Air Force, and other branches as well.

    In my case, I was promised, in writing, crypto maint. They canceled the next three start dates. My choices were another job, get out completely, or come back and do basic AGAIN when there was an opening. I took the other job (computer operations) and glad I did. Got me into IT!
  • bellheadbellhead Member Posts: 120
    Here's the wiki list of units in Ga.

    Georgia Air National Guard - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Lots of good units for IT in there.
  • wastedtimewastedtime Member Posts: 586 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Bokeh wrote: »
    Just remember, even though you have a written contract, it doesn't mean squat. Myself, and others I have had the fortune (or misfortune how ever you wish to look at it) had contracts, guaranteed jobs, etc. Get down to basic, and in the middle get called in and told we can't get you that school - classes canceled, needs changed, etc. This happened to me in the Air Force, and other branches as well.

    In my case, I was promised, in writing, crypto maint. They canceled the next three start dates. My choices were another job, get out completely, or come back and do basic AGAIN when there was an opening. I took the other job (computer operations) and glad I did. Got me into IT!

    Well I can't talk about other services but the Army will guarantee the class as long as you get through basic. Now should you fail the class, are unable to attain a clearance or something else that disqualifies you from holding that MOS then you will be at the needs of the army (I honestly can't think of anything other then those 2 and maybe a medical issue of some sort). Just make sure it is on the contract and read it carefully people have been fooled by the wording before.
  • ck86ck86 Member Posts: 62 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Airborne isn't hard really. After going through basic and AIT you should be conditioned enough for it and it's a quick process. It can be hard to get a slot sometimes, and it's very easy to lose it. I know people that lost their slots for getting in trouble in AIT over stupid things, and I know someone that was in airborne school and missed a formation and got kicked out. I don't know if things have changed much (I know basic and AIT has since 05) with airborne school though, if anything I'd think it's easier. If it's something you want to do then it's definitely a good experience.

    The things about the post 9/11 GI bill here are correct like someone above mentioned. You use it after your enlistment and you have to serve x months for the benefits. There's a nice site that breaks it down easily for you on the official va site. And yes you receive E-5 BAH (with dependents rate) while going to school over half time and not 100% online. It's pretty great, I will be utilizing it myself in 2 months.

    Like others have also said, the clearances are huge. I plan to take advantage of having an active secret and having 5 years as an IT MOS (25U). I feel a little behind starting college at 24 years old, but it was definitely a good jump start to everything. 2 deployments, paid off car, some savings, and a lot of valuable life experience. It's not for everyone, but if you make it through it's not a bad deal. Goodluck.
  • GamingCrazyGamingCrazy Member Posts: 113
    wastedtime wrote: »
    I can see you are pretty motivated about doing this.

    Airborne seems completely reasonable, just make sure you get it in writing on your enlistment paperwork.

    I don't know a lot about pathfinder but I can tell you the only ones I have seen with it have been in a combat MOS and were SSG or better. I know it has to do with planing and managing a jump so it probably isn't something a junior enlisted(grades E1-E4) would be doing any ways.

    Not sure about the National Guard as I have heard that there promotion system is a bit different. For semi-centralized promotions (SGT, and SSG) though is done on a points system with the max attainable points at 800. The areas that count toward points are PT/marksmanship, awards, Commander's evaluation, military training, civilian education, and the board. The minimum points for promotion to SGT/E5 is 350. The reason it is probably so low right now is due to some of the military re-alignment that has been going on the past few years and how new that MOS is. That MOS came about in 2005 so it isn't quite 5 years old.

    Just a note: If you come in I would recommend you have the mind set that after you complete Initial Entry Training (IET) that you will deploy. If you don't deploy then it won't be nothing but a relief, but on the other hand if you do it could hurt your motivation.

    My mind set is to deploy, to sign the papers it's always available. 25N's promotion rates are a lot higher at the moment (My recruiter was telling me).
  • ck86ck86 Member Posts: 62 ■■□□□□□□□□
    My mind set is to deploy, to sign the papers it's always available. 25N's promotion rates are a lot higher at the moment (My recruiter was telling me).

    Just realize promotion points change a lot. When I enlisted as 25U they only needed around 400 promotion points for E-5. By the time I was eligible for E-5, they were nearly 700. There are few MOS's I've seen that stay low all of the time, usually there's an influx of recruiting that MOS if there's a shortage and by the time those guys become eligible the points shoot back up from the influx.
  • motogpmanmotogpman Member Posts: 412
    Airborne is all about the mental game. Tradition and getting your wings. It isn't hard if you are willing to put forth the effort and it is something that will always be a part of you. As Wasted pointed out, you should be in shape, physically that is, after basic to get through it.

    Pathfinder used to have 3 CO units, one was a Guard unit and then Campbell and Bragg. You had to be CPL or above for enlisted and combat MOS. It was all about planning rotor and fixed wing LZ support and such. Long list of stuff. I am sure you can go to the Army website or talk to the recruiter to get more info. IT/Comm/Crypto can even point you towards SF/Ops, not sure how much things have changed over the years. The advice is to get as much as possible in writing before you get to your unit.

    Bottom line, look at the whole pic, get everything in writing, and ask questions. If the recruiter gets pissy, then shove back. NO use thinking " I should have asked this or that," after the fact. You are only young once and do it while you can. Then, when you are an old sh*tbird you can look back and smile............ Sounds like you have your head on straight, so keep us posted!
    -WIP- (70-294 and 297)

    Once MCSE 2k3 completed:

    WGU: BS in IT, Design/Management

    Finish MCITP:EA, CCNA, PMP by end of 2012

    After that, take a much needed vacation!!!!!
  • GamingCrazyGamingCrazy Member Posts: 113
    motogpman wrote: »
    Airborne is all about the mental game. Tradition and getting your wings. It isn't hard if you are willing to put forth the effort and it is something that will always be a part of you. As Wasted pointed out, you should be in shape, physically that is, after basic to get through it.

    Pathfinder used to have 3 CO units, one was a Guard unit and then Campbell and Bragg. You had to be CPL or above for enlisted and combat MOS. It was all about planning rotor and fixed wing LZ support and such. Long list of stuff. I am sure you can go to the Army website or talk to the recruiter to get more info. IT/Comm/Crypto can even point you towards SF/Ops, not sure how much things have changed over the years. The advice is to get as much as possible in writing before you get to your unit.

    Bottom line, look at the whole pic, get everything in writing, and ask questions. If the recruiter gets pissy, then shove back. NO use thinking " I should have asked this or that," after the fact. You are only young once and do it while you can. Then, when you are an old sh*tbird you can look back and smile............ Sounds like you have your head on straight, so keep us posted!

    My recruiter is a very nice guy, that provides professionalism and isn't pushing me towards the guard. He recieved top recruiter in georgia in 2007, and he always provides me with the correct information. I've been to the recruiter (NAVY) that just pushed to make his quota. I had to push this guy to go take my test, and then after that he said I can make my intial decision.

    Going on with airborne, I would like to do it for tradition and for the experience. Nothing more, nothing less.

    Question: As far as everything in writing goes for joining, how can the career advisor trick you in your contract and what should I look out for?

    Thanks!
  • wastedtimewastedtime Member Posts: 586 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Sorry I didn't mean to infer that they are going to try to trick you. Just that some stuff will not be written in plan english like my last reenlistment I got a SRB (selective reenlistment bonus) B zone for my MOS. Now what that means is they are going to give me a small sum of money for reenlisting. How much you get depends on how long you have left in, number of years you are reenlisting for, your MOS, and the current SRBs (I believe right now there isn't one).

    So it is just as much you asking good questions as doing some research about what you want to do. I completely agree with motogpman, and a lot of military training will be a mental game. All we are saying about recruiters is that there are a few out there either bad apples or get worried about their numbers more then the potential soldiers they have.

    Also on another note you may want to look at 25B as it deals with Networking, (not as heavy as 25N though) Computers, and Information Assurance.
  • GamingCrazyGamingCrazy Member Posts: 113
    wastedtime wrote: »
    Sorry I didn't mean to infer that they are going to try to trick you. Just that some stuff will not be written in plan english like my last reenlistment I got a SRB (selective reenlistment bonus) B zone for my MOS. Now what that means is they are going to give me a small sum of money for reenlisting. How much you get depends on how long you have left in, number of years you are reenlisting for, your MOS, and the current SRBs (I believe right now there isn't one).

    So it is just as much you asking good questions as doing some research about what you want to do. I completely agree with motogpman, and a lot of military training will be a mental game. All we are saying about recruiters is that there are a few out there either bad apples or get worried about their numbers more then the potential soldiers they have.

    Also on another note you may want to look at 25B as it deals with Networking, (not as heavy as 25N though) Computers, and Information Assurance.

    My ideal goal is to route to security, starting with cisco certifications and working my way up (Grabbing the basic certifications A+ and N+ as a fallback though). I've looked at 25B but I was told it is mostly grunt work (Not that I expect anything more as an E-2 until I work my way up).

    I might choose voice systems as they see to be the future, and I find it kind of interesting from what my Dad was telling me.

    Question: They won't try to trick me with my MOS if it goes in depth will they? Also, in AIT what can I expect as freedoms as far as Cell Phone use to get in contact with my parents? (I know it varies depending on Battalion). Living life, etc?

    Thanks for the help!
  • tpatt100tpatt100 Member Posts: 2,991 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I currently work in security and I cannot emphasize enough that you need a solid foundation in networking Unix/Windows to be effective at it. Nothing wrong with wanting security as a goal but you can be a sys admin and still do security as part of your job.

    Too often I run into guys who are security and cannot even find their away around a group policy editor or the IIS confguration.
  • wastedtimewastedtime Member Posts: 586 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Well I can't tell you what a 25N does, I can tell you what I believe a typical 25B does in a non-signal unit from my experiences.

    While at station:
    Required to maintain a minimum of IAT I (A+, N+ certification required, Information Assurance Technical level 1), Run lines, troubleshoot computer (or user) issues, manage file servers and web servers, conduct and verify user training on computer systems.

    While deployed/field exercise:
    Run lines, troubleshoot computer/network issues, setup maintain a CPN(a few boxes that have cisco switches, routers, juniper or cisco firewall, VoIP phones), troubleshoot FBCB2 and CPOF systems.

    There are other things but that is just a general overview of a 25B. If you want to get into voice again like in my last post 25Bs does some of that but not near as much as 25N. I don't know what you consider grunt work but that will come in almost every MOS especially as a lower enlisted.

    I can't tell you much about what IET is currently like as it has been about 8 years since I went through it. I can tell you that AIT will start out about the same as basic and they will gradually let up on you. I believe (not sure) you can have cell phones by your last phase.
  • ck86ck86 Member Posts: 62 ■■□□□□□□□□
    A little more insight from someone who is currently 25U in a non-signal company/BN...

    First thing about the MOS also is make sure when you go to MEPS you don't get screwed over. I originally went intending to be a 25B and sign a 3 year contract. I went through the entire process and finally got to where they write up your contract. The guy told me 25B is being phased out (bold faced lie) and 25U is pretty much the same thing. He wasn't necessarily wrong about 25U being similar, but he lied to me about 25B and then also told me only 4 year contracts were available - which I found later to be also untrue. At the moment I was kind of wanting to just get the show on the road and went ahead and went with what he said and regretted it. It had nothing to do with test scores or anything, just that the Army has its' needs and wants those slots filled more than others. Don't let them push you around or bullshit you, trust me they will try. Go in well informed and if they won't give you the MOS you want then tell them you'll come back.

    Anyway, in my non signal company right now my "shop" consists of me and a 25B. I was trained in/can perform all of her tasks/jobs, and in addition I deal with communication equipment she knows nothing about. Her role is basic computer troubleshooting, basic network admin tasks, and not much more out here in Iraq. Despite her being a 25B and me a 25U, we are both simply classified as "commo". People assume we both do the same things, and they would expect the same with any other 25 series thrown into our company. Very often you'll see people not performing their specific job, rather whatever spot they need you to fill and you are competent at. Also, as a 25B expect max promotion points (798 ).

    As far as AIT is concerned, you will be allowed to use cell phones. When I went through a little over 4 years ago in Fort Gordon (company with multiple 25 series MOS's) we were allowed to use them immediately. That was back with drill sergeants and whatnot, which I hear now are completely gone. We just weren't allowed to be on them past lights out, and we couldn't have them on us during formations. That will most likely be the worst case scenario. I was in one of the strictest company's in our BN. Some will let you have laptops and stuff also, but I wasn't allowed. It's also true that you work your way up to earn more privileges, but it's not really that significant. Ft Gordon and surrounding areas are pretty horrible, so there isn't much to really go out and see and unless things have changed you're stuck taking taxis everywhere. So yeah, no worries, you can call your parents...

    Lastly, as far as your grunt work comment.. as mentioned above, expect it. Do not come into the Army expecting to be treated like anything other than a child. You will be ordered around by people you think are morons, you will mop floors and clean sinks and get yelled at for not wiping the sink completely dry afterward. In Iraq/Afghanistan you will perform tasks you will think are ridiculous, you will pull duties all night bored out of your mind, you will sweep dirt covered roads to make the dirt look pretty, you will pick up cigarette butts even if you don't smoke, you will stand in formation for hours waiting for nothing. It's not a typical job, and in the Army you are first and foremost a soldier regardless of your specialty. I'm not discouraging you, simply telling you the reality that you should fully expect.
  • bellheadbellhead Member Posts: 120
    kasel23 wrote: »
    Lastly, as far as your grunt work comment.. as mentioned above, expect it. Do not come into the Army expecting to be treated like anything other than a child. You will be ordered around by people you think are morons, you will mop floors and clean sinks and get yelled at for not wiping the sink completely dry afterward. In Iraq/Afghanistan you will perform tasks you will think are ridiculous, you will pull duties all night bored out of your mind, you will sweep dirt covered roads to make the dirt look pretty, you will pick up cigarette butts even if you don't smoke, you will stand in formation for hours waiting for nothing. It's not a typical job, and in the Army you are first and foremost a soldier regardless of your specialty. I'm not discouraging you, simply telling you the reality that you should fully expect.

    This is what is expected in boot and while you are in training. In Navy A school while you were waiting to class up "have enough people to start" you would be assigned to usually the building or grounds supervisor somewhere on the base. You would spend about 6 hours a day doing some type of manual work at about 1/2 speed, unless you went to the galley "shudder" where you would work 16 hour days until you classed up. It happened to me I spent 32 days straight getting up at 2:30 am and working until 7:15 pm. No weekends off except once. I did get one day off when my wisdom teeth were pulled.

    The biggest difference between the Army and Air force is, While I was deployed with my guard unit I saw army guys being "smoked" by a NCO. Never would happen in the Air Force or Navy they would be loosing their stripes. In the Navy you couldn't be smoked outside of boot camp and only in boot camp by your company commanders, unless you really screwed up and went to mini mo "motivational training" trust me you didn't want to go there.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    tpatt100 wrote: »
    I am a 25N in the National Guard now. Been doing Signal for about 14 years. Signal got me into IT and when I deployed to Iraq in 2003 I got put in an IT security position with Civilian contractors due to my IT background. When I got back I was offered a position doing DOD security work due to my experience in Iraq. That job doubled my salary and from there advanced to my current position

    I am thinking about going guard as a 25N. Do you enjoy it? I looked at all of the networking and linux training that seems to be offered which looks cool. How much money do you get from the GI bill? Have you ever been stationed over seas? I am just concerned because I am married and I don't want to have to leave my wife behind which is why I would rather go guard than Active Duty.
  • GamingCrazyGamingCrazy Member Posts: 113
    kasel23 wrote: »
    A little more insight from someone who is currently 25U in a non-signal company/BN...

    First thing about the MOS also is make sure when you go to MEPS you don't get screwed over. I originally went intending to be a 25B and sign a 3 year contract. I went through the entire process and finally got to where they write up your contract. The guy told me 25B is being phased out (bold faced lie) and 25U is pretty much the same thing. He wasn't necessarily wrong about 25U being similar, but he lied to me about 25B and then also told me only 4 year contracts were available - which I found later to be also untrue. At the moment I was kind of wanting to just get the show on the road and went ahead and went with what he said and regretted it. It had nothing to do with test scores or anything, just that the Army has its' needs and wants those slots filled more than others. Don't let them push you around or bullshit you, trust me they will try. Go in well informed and if they won't give you the MOS you want then tell them you'll come back.

    Anyway, in my non signal company right now my "shop" consists of me and a 25B. I was trained in/can perform all of her tasks/jobs, and in addition I deal with communication equipment she knows nothing about. Her role is basic computer troubleshooting, basic network admin tasks, and not much more out here in Iraq. Despite her being a 25B and me a 25U, we are both simply classified as "commo". People assume we both do the same things, and they would expect the same with any other 25 series thrown into our company. Very often you'll see people not performing their specific job, rather whatever spot they need you to fill and you are competent at. Also, as a 25B expect max promotion points (798 ).

    As far as AIT is concerned, you will be allowed to use cell phones. When I went through a little over 4 years ago in Fort Gordon (company with multiple 25 series MOS's) we were allowed to use them immediately. That was back with drill sergeants and whatnot, which I hear now are completely gone. We just weren't allowed to be on them past lights out, and we couldn't have them on us during formations. That will most likely be the worst case scenario. I was in one of the strictest company's in our BN. Some will let you have laptops and stuff also, but I wasn't allowed. It's also true that you work your way up to earn more privileges, but it's not really that significant. Ft Gordon and surrounding areas are pretty horrible, so there isn't much to really go out and see and unless things have changed you're stuck taking taxis everywhere. So yeah, no worries, you can call your parents...

    Lastly, as far as your grunt work comment.. as mentioned above, expect it. Do not come into the Army expecting to be treated like anything other than a child. You will be ordered around by people you think are morons, you will mop floors and clean sinks and get yelled at for not wiping the sink completely dry afterward. In Iraq/Afghanistan you will perform tasks you will think are ridiculous, you will pull duties all night bored out of your mind, you will sweep dirt covered roads to make the dirt look pretty, you will pick up cigarette butts even if you don't smoke, you will stand in formation for hours waiting for nothing. It's not a typical job, and in the Army you are first and foremost a soldier regardless of your specialty. I'm not discouraging you, simply telling you the reality that you should fully expect.

    Yeah I understand, basically from I what was being told is how good you do in school (Percentile) will almost dictate what you do as your job. Your maturity, ability to get stuff done also dictates. If you succeed on your assignments, you are basically the go to guy, the guy that can get the job done. "Does this sound right?"

    Just making sure my interpretation is correct.
  • tpatt100tpatt100 Member Posts: 2,991 ■■■■■■■■■□
    knwminus wrote: »
    I am thinking about going guard as a 25N. Do you enjoy it? I looked at all of the networking and linux training that seems to be offered which looks cool. How much money do you get from the GI bill? Have you ever been stationed over seas? I am just concerned because I am married and I don't want to have to leave my wife behind which is why I would rather go guard than Active Duty.

    Well I did a year in Iraq in 2003-2004, right now most of my unit went to Afghanistan while I was away for training and some went to Kosovo.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    tpatt100 wrote: »
    Well I did a year in Iraq in 2003-2004, right now most of my unit went to Afghanistan while I was away for training and some went to Kosovo.

    Do you stay at "home" (rather are you usually in the US) or are you deployed overseas a lot? Do you know the rules on family (can you take your significant other with you)?
  • GamingCrazyGamingCrazy Member Posts: 113
    knwminus wrote: »
    Do you stay at "home" (rather are you usually in the US) or are you deployed overseas a lot? Do you know the rules on family (can you take your significant other with you)?

    Take a significant other to Iraq, are you crazy? Depending on your rank I think, if it's not a heavy combat zone you can have them live on base, more regulated for air force though (more family orientated)

    Question: Do you think I can afford Cisco Academy for my CCNA and CCNP if I chose to for certs first, and does the army cover certs.

    Question 2: Does the coast guard require a Top Secret for IT?

    Thanks!
  • ck86ck86 Member Posts: 62 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Yeah I understand, basically from I what was being told is how good you do in school (Percentile) will almost dictate what you do as your job. Your maturity, ability to get stuff done also dictates. If you succeed on your assignments, you are basically the go to guy, the guy that can get the job done. "Does this sound right?"

    Just making sure my interpretation is correct.

    Not sure where you got this impression but it's not true at all. The school is pass/fail, nothing more - you could be the best in the class or the guy who barely passes and you are not seen any differently by the Army. You are randomly assigned a duty location based on needs of the Army, and then you land in a unit that needs your specific MOS and you fill whatever role they need you to. Your maturity and ability to get stuff done amount to nothing in regards to your job, perhaps you'll get more responsibilities if you prove you can handle them, but you still answer to NCOs. As a lower enlisted it doesn't matter how smart, mature, and motivated you are, you still pay your dues.

    Also, the likelihood of you getting a Top Secret in the military isn't high unless it's required by your MOS. They are given on a needed basis only, and if you are not required one for your mission you will not be eligible. In my company of ~200, I'd say about 20% have secret clearances and maybe two people have a top secret.

    Also yes the military will cover some certs. You have to go to the education center to see what they will cover.
  • tpatt100tpatt100 Member Posts: 2,991 ■■■■■■■■■□
    knwminus wrote: »
    Do you stay at "home" (rather are you usually in the US) or are you deployed overseas a lot? Do you know the rules on family (can you take your significant other with you)?

    You stay at home and keep your regular job unless you deploy and if you do its in support of the war. Its not like active duty.
  • GamingCrazyGamingCrazy Member Posts: 113
    kasel23 wrote: »
    Not sure where you got this impression but it's not true at all. The school is pass/fail, nothing more - you could be the best in the class or the guy who barely passes and you are not seen any differently by the Army. You are randomly assigned a duty location based on needs of the Army, and then you land in a unit that needs your specific MOS and you fill whatever role they need you to. Your maturity and ability to get stuff done amount to nothing in regards to your job, perhaps you'll get more responsibilities if you prove you can handle them, but you still answer to NCOs. As a lower enlisted it doesn't matter how smart, mature, and motivated you are, you still pay your dues.

    Also, the likelihood of you getting a Top Secret in the military isn't high unless it's required by your MOS. They are given on a needed basis only, and if you are not required one for your mission you will not be eligible. In my company of ~200, I'd say about 20% have secret clearances and maybe two people have a top secret.

    Also yes the military will cover some certs. You have to go to the education center to see what they will cover.

    Would you say it's a good foot in the door for IT Experience? I'm trying to get a degree, certs, and experience so I can be a good candidate in the near future. Thanks!
  • BokehBokeh Member Posts: 1,636 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Most employers look very highly on military experience. My advice? If you think the military is for you, pick a branch that has an IT career that you find of interest. Whether it is active duty, guard or reserves. Take advantage of EVERY opportunity for training possible - use the ongoing college discounts while in, see if you can go to seminars in your area, study study and then study more for certs. Also, make contacts with those already in. You never know who will end up on the outside world in a position to hire you for one of their openings.

    Each branch has their own IT path. I did read recently where the Air Force is pushing cyber security in basic training for all recruits, and is establishing a cyber warrior career field as well to help defend and protect their networks.
  • GamingCrazyGamingCrazy Member Posts: 113
    Question: After I get back from basic and AIT, would this be a good route to go i'm interested in cisco and obtaining CCNA as my starting goals.


    Networking Specialist (a.a.s)


    Associate of Applied Science Degree
    CIN3


    Program Description
    The networking specialist degree is designed to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, principles, and techniques required in the field of computer information systems. Graduates receive a networking specialist associate of applied science degree. (Program Length: 6 Quarters Minimum)


    or



    spacer.gifCisco Network Specialist CCNA (Certificate)


    Certificate Program
    5BG1


    Program Description
    The purpose of Cisco network specialist certificate CCNA is to teach students the principles, practices and skills needed to design, build and maintain small to medium-size local area networks and wide area networks capable of supporting national and global organizations. In addition, this technical certificate will prepare them for the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification exam(s). The CCNA certification indicates a foundation in and apprentice knowledge of networking. CCNA certified professionals can install, configure, and operate LAN, WAN, and dial access services for small networks (100 nodes or fewer), including but not limited to use of these protocols: IP, EIGRP, Serial, Frame Relay, IP RIP, VLANS, Ethernet, Access Lists. Students applying for this certificate must provide proof of prior completion of CIS 1140. Applicants to this program are accepted every summer and winter quarters. (Program Length: 4 Quarters Minimum)
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