Questions about IT's.. HELP PLEASE!!

RJCRJC Registered Users Posts: 1 ■□□□□□□□□□
I'm a newbie to this web page.. I'm in the military and I'm a mechanic but its time for a career change.. SO I've been looking up some high paying jobs. One of the jobs I found very interesting was a Computer Engineer. So I looked further into it and so far I found 3 types of Computer Engineers. There are the hardware types the software types and the ones who just fix the internal parts of a computer.. Anyways I'm sure yall know about all of this, but the internet is stating that computer engineers earn around 60-100K a year.

Now I've always loved fixing things and tearing them apart, But I dont know nothing about computers other than how to type and fix the basic stuff. Other than that I'm pretty much lost icon_rolleyes.gif.. So I would like to become a Computer Engineer to learn what I dont know and earn a good pay check doing it. The local community college where im from offer computer networking technologies, computer programming technologies, and computer servicing technologies. My question is these are the 3 classes that they have to offer are they the classes that I need to earn that 60-100K a year or are they the classes that will teach me all the stuff about computers? Or should I look into different colleges? any sudgestions on what colleges to go to? Am I even looking up the right classes for a Computer engineer? because these classes are for a tech school.. Please help

Thanks

Rob

Comments

  • historian1974historian1974 Member Posts: 59 ■■■□□□□□□□
    While jobs in IT can be lucrative, please be aware that a $60k to $100k salary is highly unlikely if you're just entering the field. And like any vocation, you should do it because that's what you want to do, not just because of salary potential. What is your Plan B if you take those classes and decide IT isn't for you? Understand that IT can be a highly competitive field and even getting an entry level position can take time. A four year degree is starting to become a requirement for many jobs on top of industry certifications.

    Computer Engineering is one discipline in the broad field of IT. It can range from designing an coding software to actual board level design (akin to electrical engineering). Networking, computer programming, and computer servicing technologies (i.e. desktop support) are entirely different parts of the puzzle.

    I suggest taking the aforementioned classes to see what best fits your interest. If you feel your interests lean toward a particular area, continue on with other classes related to that area. You cannot learn everything there is to know with one class...or one hundred classes. IT is a field in which one must be a perpetual learner.

    If you decide you like it, you might try to change ratings (MOS) and get some job experience under your belt before you leave the military - this can definitely help you in the long run. You might also want to contact your command's career counselor (I'm not sure what branch you're in, so I'll use the Navy term.) to see what options are available to you.
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Member Posts: 2,333 ■■■■■■■□□□
    RJC wrote: »
    My question is these are the 3 classes that they have to offer are they the classes that I need to earn that 60-100K a year or are they the classes that will teach me all the stuff about computers?

    It depends on the schools curriculum.

    In the general media, when someone says "Computer Engineer" they are probably talking about a software engineer aka programmer. Sure you can make 100k+ as a programmer but is it something that you really want to do? You need to try a few things first to see what you like. Based on your current experience and knowledge, you probably will not see 60-100k for another 7-10 years. Remember, I said "probably".
  • petedudepetedude Member Posts: 1,510
    phoeneous wrote: »
    It depends on the schools curriculum. . .

    A broad-based IT degree program (WGU's, for example) will expose a candidate to a number of IT functions that said candidate might not get an opportunity to sample otherwise.
    Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there.
    --Will Rogers
  • ColbyGColbyG Member Posts: 1,264
    Classes don't get you $100K. Experience and abilities are what make you valuable. Making $100K in IT isn't easy, at least not in my area. In NYC, $100k is like $50-70k here. I don't know too many people in IT making $100k with my company.
  • phantasmphantasm Member Posts: 995
    The IT field is not the place to come to for a job anymore... there are an over abundance of people wanting to get in and not enough jobs. If you wanted to do it for the money then think again, entry wages are around $30k if you're lucky. Also, food for thought, it took me 9yrs to get my first IT job. My advise, stay in the army, talk with the retention NCO and find out about reclassifying as a 25N providing your ASVAB scores are good enough.

    Edit to add: If you want to see a 4yr BS in CE curriculum then follow this link and click on "Preview Curriculum". This is the school my wife attended. Also, not to dissuade you but any Engineering degree will require copious amounts of math and physics.

    http://www.fit.edu/programs/ugrad/bs_computer_engineering
    "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man." -Heraclitus
  • MentholMooseMentholMoose Senior Member Member Posts: 1,524 ■■■■■■■■□□
    RJC wrote: »
    The local community college where im from offer computer networking technologies, computer programming technologies, and computer servicing technologies. My question is these are the 3 classes that they have to offer are they the classes that I need to earn that 60-100K a year or are they the classes that will teach me all the stuff about computers? Or should I look into different colleges? any sudgestions on what colleges to go to? Am I even looking up the right classes for a Computer engineer? because these classes are for a tech school.. Please help
    A community college can be a great way to learn about IT and get many of the skills and experience needed to work in IT. However, you will have to do a lot more than three classes to learn enough to work in IT, let alone actually get a job. Look into the various CIS programs your community college offers, and do at least an AAS (or a full AS, if possible) in one of the tracks. I did an AS in CIS and it was highly beneficial to my career (not so much the paper, but rather the skills and experience).
    MentholMoose
    LFCE - MCITP: EDA7, VA, SA, EA - MCSA:S 2003 - CCA (PVS 5, XD 3 / 4 / 5, XS 5 / 6) - VCP 4 / 5
  • phoeneousphoeneous Go ping yourself... Member Posts: 2,333 ■■■■■■■□□□
    phantasm wrote: »
    Also, food for thought, it took me 9yrs to get my first IT job.

    Seriously?
  • phantasmphantasm Member Posts: 995
    phoeneous wrote: »
    Seriously?

    Unfortunately yes. I got off active duty in 2002 and started looking for work, it wasn't until 2007 that I landed an actual IT job. Before 2007 I worked as a technician and data analyst for Comcast. So, here in 2010 I am on my second IT job, so I guess it was 7 yrs for my first IT job.
    "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man." -Heraclitus
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    phantasm wrote: »
    Unfortunately yes. I got off active duty in 2002 and started looking for work, it wasn't until 2007 that I landed an actual IT job. Before 2007 I worked as a technician and data analyst for Comcast. So, here in 2010 I am on my second IT job, so I guess it was 7 yrs for my first IT job.


    Ouch man. I had multiple offers before I even left active duty. What did you do in the military? I'm assuming you weren't signal.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • phantasmphantasm Member Posts: 995
    Ouch man. I had multiple offers before I even left active duty. What did you do in the military? I'm assuming you weren't signal.

    Not at all. I was a Boatswain's Mate in the Navy. Granted I was the admin the ships email server with an interim clearance, but that wasn't enough. I had plenty of experience in high school in but none of it went on the resume. So I did my A.S. in CIS and that got me no where. I worked odd jobs like Home Depot and Block Buster while trying to find an IT job. Then in 2006 I got a job installing for Comcast and troubleshooting RF. After that I landed in the Data Center for Comcast as an Analyst interfacing with the AS400's. Finally in 2008 I landed a position as an IT analyst for a healthcare company. At that time I got my CCENT and was promptly laid off. In 2009 I landed my current job as a Network Tech for a national ISP in a NOC. After becoming perm from contractor I was made a Network Tech II and then finished my CCNA.

    It's been a long road but I'm slowly getting to where I want to be.... just not quick enough though.
    "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man." -Heraclitus
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    Way to stick with it man. I'm not sure if I would have lasted that long without moving on to something else.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • inthemixgainthemixga Registered Users Posts: 2 ■□□□□□□□□□
  • inthemixgainthemixga Registered Users Posts: 2 ■□□□□□□□□□
    When I got off AD in 99, there were no problems with jobs at the height of the boom, but today even with certs and experience, it's still very difficult. But when you do find a job, it generally pays pretty well
  • bellheadbellhead Member Posts: 120
    phantasm wrote: »
    Not at all. I was a Boatswain's Mate in the Navy.
    [/code]


    You mean you were once a master paint chipper:D:D:D
  • phantasmphantasm Member Posts: 995
    bellhead wrote: »
    [/code]


    You mean you were once a master paint chipper:D:D:D

    Correction, as a Deck Seamen I chipped paint. As a Boatswain's Mate (BM3) I made others chip paint while drinking coffee. icon_wink.gif

    Edit to add: After 2yrs in the IT field I find myself, this morning, staring at 2 job offers. Both for a Network Engineer position and about a $10k annual pay increase. Hm. Decisions.
    "No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man." -Heraclitus
  • kiki1579kiki1579 Member Posts: 47 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Being an actual Computer Engineer making $60K takes a degree and several years experience. The actual job itself is more engineering than say networking/programming, although there is some of that involved, plus there's the math aspect of it. Any engineering job takes a LOT of math, so if that's for you...then it's good. If I were you, I'd research what opportunities you have in the military by switching your career field and talk with your recruiter about that. One other aspect of the computer field in general is that you dont stop learning. I would start small, but diversify yourself, get a little bit of everything on board (networking, programming, sys admin, etc) that way you are better off.
  • bellheadbellhead Member Posts: 120
    phantasm wrote: »
    Correction, as a Deck Seamen I chipped paint. As a Boatswain's Mate (BM3) I made others chip paint while drinking coffee. icon_wink.gif

    Used to love chipping paint as an ET....Thought I had picked a good rate only to find out the PM's on antenna masts involved chipping paint. When that pm came up I hid in the crypto room as I was the only crypto ET, mine pm's conviently overlapped...
  • tpatt100tpatt100 Member Posts: 2,991 ■■■■■■■■■□
    phantasm wrote: »
    Unfortunately yes. I got off active duty in 2002 and started looking for work, it wasn't until 2007 that I landed an actual IT job. Before 2007 I worked as a technician and data analyst for Comcast. So, here in 2010 I am on my second IT job, so I guess it was 7 yrs for my first IT job.

    I had a crap ton of job opportunities during that time period. In fact I doubled my salary during that time frame.

    I am seeing plenty of entry level opportunities in my area. The problem is people with experience who lost their job are taking them.
  • earweedearweed Member Posts: 5,192 ■■■■■■■■■□
    tpatt100 wrote: »
    I am seeing plenty of entry level opportunities in my area. The problem is people with experience who lost their job are taking them.
    Same here, but the "entry level" jobs ask for 3-4 years experience.
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
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