Questions about the 35 hours of the PMP

N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
I read on the official PMI site that in order to sit for the PMP you have
  • Bachelors Degree
  • 35 Hours of training
  • 4,500 hours / 3 years of training.
I am wondering where do you get these training hours from? I am a little confused. Does it have to be an accredited program?

Thanks in advance.

-N2
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Comments

  • pakgeekpakgeek Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Check out your local PMI chapter, they might offer training classes. Also, i'm not sure how good this is but this is a cheap way of getting the 35 training hours requirements out of the way - PMP Exam Preparation with The PM PrepCast - PMP Exam Video Preparation
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAPosts: 4,170Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    I thought the 4,500 hours was actual documented PM experience.
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCSA 7, learning Ansible
    Future: RHCE? VCAP6.5-DCD?
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    blargoe wrote: »
    I thought the 4,500 hours was actual documented PM experience.


    My apologizes I meant 4,500 hours of actually PM experience. Not training.


    TYPO
  • pakgeekpakgeek Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    N2IT wrote: »
    My apologizes I meant 4,500 hours of actually PM experience. Not training.


    TYPO

    Sorry, I meant the 35 training hours and not the experience hours....
  • eMeSeMeS Posts: 1,875Member
    Usually you get the training hours from a PMI REP (Registered Education Provider) that can offer classes that specifically meet this criteria.

    What is a Registered Education Provider (R.E.P.)? | Project Management Institute

    MS
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    pakgeek wrote: »
    Sorry, I meant the 35 training hours and not the experience hours....


    I understand.

    I am along ways away, but I am in the position to get the necessary experience, so I just wanted to weight my options and get some additional information.

    I might just go for the transition ITIL to be honest. Only problem is the PMP is recognized by a lot more organizations currently. At least in my small scope of PM work. Money is a serious constraint with me :)

    Thoughts?
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    eMeS wrote: »
    Usually you get the training hours from a PMI REP (Registered Education Provider) that can offer classes that specifically meet this criteria.

    What is a Registered Education Provider (R.E.P.)? | Project Management Institute

    MS

    Thanks MS

    I found that link very helpful. Looks like Devry has their own certification program that gives you the required PDU hours necessary to complete that part of the qualification.

    I'll look around a little bit more of course.

    I am looking for good return on my time and money. I really enjoy the ITIL material, and wanted to try for the RCV or Transition eventually. I still have quite a bit of time to plan and prepare which ever route I go.

    Does the PDU's from ITIL count towards the PMP?

    Again thanks for the information.
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAPosts: 4,170Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    If I were in your shoes now I would definitely be diligent about documenting your project hours and getting your manager to verify that for you. If you have other training that you need for the new job, maybe that should take precedence since you're probably not close to having the required hours to achieve the certification yet. Unless you are itching for some formal PM training now, of course.
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCSA 7, learning Ansible
    Future: RHCE? VCAP6.5-DCD?
  • pakgeekpakgeek Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    N2IT wrote: »
    I understand.

    I am along ways away, but I am in the position to get the necessary experience, so I just wanted to weight my options and get some additional information.

    I might just go for the transition ITIL to be honest. Only problem is the PMP is recognized by a lot more organizations currently. At least in my small scope of PM work. Money is a serious constraint with me :)

    Thoughts?

    I'm in the same boat as you; don't have the 4500 hours to sit for the PMP as yet so might sit for the CAPM exam, not the ideal situation but I believe its the step in the right direction. I know MS doesn't think highly of CAPM :)
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    pakgeek wrote: »
    I'm in the same boat as you; don't have the 4500 hours to sit for the PMP as yet so might sit for the CAPM exam, not the ideal situation but I believe its the step in the right direction. I know MS doesn't think highly of CAPM :)

    If I am forced to go that route I might just do a management leadership certification from Washington University or the RCV or Transition.

    I am not sold on the CAPM.
  • eMeSeMeS Posts: 1,875Member
    N2IT wrote: »
    Does the PDU's from ITIL count towards the PMP?

    If they were received from a PMI REP then they should count for continuing education credits, but I don't think they count towards the initial project management training requirement. I could be wrong about this.

    MS
  • eMeSeMeS Posts: 1,875Member
    pakgeek wrote: »
    I know MS doesn't think highly of CAPM :)

    Yeah, it's more that the market doesn't seem to value to CAPM enough to justify the expense. I've still yet to meet anyone that holds it...it's either the PMP or PRINCE2 foundation and practitioner that you see most often.

    PgMP doesn't seem to be all that popular either...

    MS
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    blargoe wrote: »
    If I were in your shoes now I would definitely be diligent about documenting your project hours and getting your manager to verify that for you. If you have other training that you need for the new job, maybe that should take precedence since you're probably not close to having the required hours to achieve the certification yet. Unless you are itching for some formal PM training now, of course.

    I agree I just like to make mind maps for the future.

    My current certifications that I will be taking in the near future are Server + and Security +.

    After those I will reevaluate. I just wanted to get an idea and to see how feasible it was going to be with my schedule and training.

    I might actually just pop back to ITIL for a while. RCV or Transition and CSI would be something I would consider.

    Anyway thanks again for all the great in put.
  • newmovenewmove Posts: 108Member
    N2IT, I thought you were studying for SQL few weeks ago,you are now reading Server+?
  • eMeSeMeS Posts: 1,875Member
    N2IT wrote: »
    RCV or Transition and CSI would be something I would consider.

    Giving the CSI class this week...that one is tough because it touches every other lifecycle phase and attempts to cover a ton of material in a 3-day time period.

    If you need any of the ITIL books, hit me up...I came into a set and am selling them individually at about $50 off the retail price....

    MS
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    newmove wrote: »
    N2IT, I thought you were studying for SQL few weeks ago,you are now reading Server+?

    I did study for SQL development and failed the exam by 180 points, it's been documented in the SQL section. I won't be retaking this exam. The exam is an overkill for what I need. I write basic reports utilizing Joins, Unions etc. No need to pass this exam. After taking the exam I realized how much you really needed to know. This is for a DBA developer, not an intermediate user.

    I decided to grab some low hanging fruit and get a high overview of server technology. Currently I am reading the book in my subject line, I still have 200+ pages left. With children, a wife, and a brand new supervisory position I have only been able to spend 1 hour a night on this particular book, although I will say momentum is picking up. I am starting to get into the OS side of things, which I am more experienced with.

    Again I just recently accepted a managerial IT position, so of course I am changing my gears. If you were a mechanic, but recently got hired for a IT service desk, would you still continue learning the automotive technology? Of course not! A lot of progressive minds use a tactic called baseline thinking. Each day you wake up you evaluate your situation and determine if your path is the best path to take.

    For instance if you went to college and registered for the communications program, but semester two you realized you hated this field would you continue to stay in the program? If so that would be foolish and naive.

    I only brought up the PMP for overall knowledge. First of all I only have 6 months worth of PM experience which automatically eliminates me from the certification. So no I am not looking to take the exam right now, I am just querying about the PMP and the requirements, because one day I might want to take it.
  • pakgeekpakgeek Posts: 53Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    eMeS wrote: »
    Giving the CSI class this week...that one is tough because it touches every other lifecycle phase and attempts to cover a ton of material in a 3-day time period.

    If you need any of the ITIL books, hit me up...I came into a set and am selling them individually at about $50 off the retail price....

    MS

    The ITIL books are undergoing a revision, so would it have any affect on the exams?
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    eMeS wrote: »
    Giving the CSI class this week...that one is tough because it touches every other lifecycle phase and attempts to cover a ton of material in a 3-day time period.

    If you need any of the ITIL books, hit me up...I came into a set and am selling them individually at about $50 off the retail price....

    MS

    Absolutely. I am looking for all lifecycles, besides the SO.
  • eMeSeMeS Posts: 1,875Member
    pakgeek wrote: »
    The ITIL books are undergoing a revision, so would it have any affect on the exams?

    Very little I think...but that remains to be seen. As I understand it, the revision will simply correct some minor inconsistencies between the books.

    MS
  • newmovenewmove Posts: 108Member
    N2IT wrote: »
    I did study for SQL development and failed the exam by 180 points, it's been documented in the SQL section. I won't be retaking this exam. The exam is an overkill for what I need. I write basic reports utilizing Joins, Unions etc. No need to pass this exam. After taking the exam I realized how much you really needed to know. This is for a DBA developer, not an intermediate user.

    I decided to grab some low hanging fruit and get a high overview of server technology. Currently I am reading the book in my subject line, I still have 200+ pages left. With children, a wife, and a brand new supervisory position I have only been able to spend 1 hour a night on this particular book, although I will say momentum is picking up. I am starting to get into the OS side of things, which I am more experienced with.

    Again I just recently accepted a managerial IT position, so of course I am changing my gears. If you were a mechanic, but recently got hired for a IT service desk, would you still continue learning the automotive technology? Of course not! A lot of progressive minds use a tactic called baseline thinking. Each day you wake up you evaluate your situation and determine if your path is the best path to take.

    For instance if you went to college and registered for the communications program, but semester two you realized you hated this field would you continue to stay in the program? If so that would be foolish and naive.

    I only brought up the PMP for overall knowledge. First of all I only have 6 months worth of PM experience which automatically eliminates me from the certification. So no I am not looking to take the exam right now, I am just querying about the PMP and the requirements, because one day I might want to take it.

    Yeah I understand every bit of what you've just said. I wish you all the best!
  • erpadminerpadmin Posts: 4,165Member
    N2IT wrote: »
    If you were a mechanic, but recently got hired for a IT service desk, would you still continue learning the automotive technology?

    Interesting question, especially the apples to oranges career transition, but I'm gonna go with it.

    It depends on one's passions. If someone was a mechanic, but became a CEO of a multinational company, if his passion was still with tinkering with cars, then I can see him doing mechanic work for just HIS cars.

    A more realistic scenario: If you were a desktop support analyst, but became hired to do system administration/database administration, would you still want to build out your own box?

    There are those who would say "absolutely! I have geek pride...."

    Then you have folks like me who have better things to do. I won't hire someone to build me a box BUT I will buy a box preconfigured from either Dell or HP. I am very capable of building out a server....I just don't want to because I have better things to spend my money on. And _______ doesn't get ____ over things like that anymore.

    I was pretty sure that desktop support was not my passion. In the end, it's all about passion, I think. You're gonna do what you love to do, regardless of status in life.
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    newmove wrote: »
    Yeah I understand every bit of what you've just said. I wish you all the best!


    Back at you!

    Speaking of which, how did you find the Prince 2 F exam?

    Just curious, since we are on the topic on PM certifications.
  • newmovenewmove Posts: 108Member
    N2IT wrote: »
    Back at you!

    Speaking of which, how did you find the Prince 2 F exam?

    Just curious, since we are on the topic on PM certifications.

    I'm more inclined to say you'll be a better PM using PRINCE2 methodology. I have only done the foundation and will do the Practitioner later in the year. The Foundation exams was very easy for me and thats the general opinion too. Though people go to ATOs for the foundation,I found it straightforward and probably waste of money,I'll rather go seek the help of the ATOs for the Practitioner which is tougher based on what I have heard.

    PRINCE2 doesn't require all the stringent requirements of the PMP.The only limiting factor is the US not embracing the qualification as much.
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    newmove wrote: »
    I'm more inclined to say you'll be a better PM using PRINCE2 methodology. I have only done the foundation and will do the Practitioner later in the year. The Foundation exams was very easy for me and thats the general opinion too. Though people go to ATOs for the foundation,I found it straightforward and probably waste of money,I'll rather go seek the help of the ATOs for the Practitioner which is tougher based on what I have heard.

    PRINCE2 doesn't require all the stringent requirements of the PMP.The only limiting factor is the US not embracing the qualification as much.

    So no PDU's required or years of experience?
  • eMeSeMeS Posts: 1,875Member
    newmove wrote: »
    I'm more inclined to say you'll be a better PM using PRINCE2 methodology. I have only done the foundation and will do the Practitioner later in the year. The Foundation exams was very easy for me and thats the general opinion too. Though people go to ATOs for the foundation,I found it straightforward and probably waste of money,I'll rather go seek the help of the ATOs for the Practitioner which is tougher based on what I have heard.

    PRINCE2 doesn't require all the stringent requirements of the PMP.The only limiting factor is the US not embracing the qualification as much.

    Yeah, but it's almost impossible to take PRINCE2 tests in the US. You pretty much have to do it at an embassy or a consulate, on very specific dates.

    The other thing is that PRINCE2 isn't really what employers look for in the US, so the benefit for someone over here would be negligible.

    I was in England last Fall and I intended to go to an open testing center to knock out the foundation and practitioner for PRINCE2...unfortunately, those testing slots are often filled months in advance, so I wasn't able to do it.

    MS
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    eMeS wrote: »
    Yeah, but it's almost impossible to take PRINCE2 tests in the US. You pretty much have to do it at an embassy or a consulate, on very specific dates.

    The other thing is that PRINCE2 isn't really what employers look for in the US, so the benefit for someone over here would be negligible.

    I was in England last Fall and I intended to go to an open testing center to knock out the foundation and practitioner for PRINCE2...unfortunately, those testing slots are often filled months in advance, so I wasn't able to do it.

    MS

    That is interesting information.
  • eMeSeMeS Posts: 1,875Member
    N2IT wrote: »
    That is interesting information.

    APMG-UK - PRINCE2® Open Centre Examinations

    "Exams outside the UK

    There is limited availability for public exams to be sat overseas in some countries, via the premises of the British Council. Please let us know the country in which you would like to take the exam by emailing [email protected] and we will advise you accordingly."

    I've emailed them about it, and if I remember correctly you had to go to DC on certain dates to take the exams.

    MS
  • newmovenewmove Posts: 108Member
    eMeS wrote: »
    Yeah, but it's almost impossible to take PRINCE2 tests in the US. You pretty much have to do it at an embassy or a consulate, on very specific dates.

    The other thing is that PRINCE2 isn't really what employers look for in the US, so the benefit for someone over here would be negligible.

    I was in England last Fall and I intended to go to an open testing center to knock out the foundation and practitioner for PRINCE2...unfortunately, those testing slots are often filled months in advance, so I wasn't able to do it.

    MS

    There's no much difference IMO. I have watched some PMP tutorials and tried Rita M's questions before and could answer most of the questions easily.

    I'm not qualified to write PMP,I'd have loved to get it.
  • newmovenewmove Posts: 108Member
    N2IT wrote: »
    So no PDU's required or years of experience?

    Its not a requirement. I could get a Practitioners certificate tomorrow if I'm ready.
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    newmove wrote: »
    Its not a requirement. I could get a Practitioners certificate tomorrow if I'm ready.


    Good luck, that is exciting man!

    I hope you get it soon :)
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