Certification Path Advice Anyone????

degreshdegresh Registered Users Posts: 7 ■□□□□□□□□□
I'm currently studying for my A + exam. I was planning on going for NET + and Security + next but I've been considering not even getting the Sec + or NET + and just going straight for the CCNA. I want to build a solid foundation and be well rounded, but I think the Cisco certs hold more weight and will get me a better job. Any advice?

Comments

  • Asif DaslAsif Dasl Member Posts: 2,116 ■■■■■■■■□□
  • ibcritnibcritn Member Posts: 340
    First what do you want to do? Sounds like your starting out and you'll likely be in a support type role, but do you want to work towards working with Cisco switches/routers, etc.

    If you do want to work with them the CCNA is a great choice. If you would prefer to stay server side then id say the 3 CompTIA with some MCTS leading to MCITP:SA

    The CCNA will certainly help you land a job in a NOC early on likely doing support for Cisco stuff, but if thats not your passion you may not like your job....or be able to move up from that role
    CISSP | GCIH | CEH | CNDA | LPT | ECSA | CCENT | MCTS | A+ | Net+ | Sec+

    Next Up: Linux+/RHCSA, GCIA
  • PsoasmanPsoasman Senior Member Member Posts: 2,687 ■■■■■■■■■□
    degresh wrote: »
    I'm currently studying for my A + exam. I was planning on going for NET + and Security + next but I've been considering not even getting the Sec + or NET + and just going straight for the CCNA. I want to build a solid foundation and be well rounded, but I think the Cisco certs hold more weight and will get me a better job. Any advice?

    I would do the the A+, N+, and S+. That should give you your foundation. I agree that the CCNA would be a good next step, if you wanted to get into networking. If you are interested in the desktop support or servers, then the MCITP tracks would be a good fit.

    It all depends on where your interests are.
  • N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    I would do A+ and S+ and then CCNA.
  • rogue2shadowrogue2shadow CISSP, GXPN, OSCE, OSCP, OSWP, eMAPT, CEH, CNDA, A+, Network+, Security+ Member Posts: 1,501 ■■■■■■■■□□
    My advice is along the lines of the great users above, but I think, in terms of bang for your buck, you could self study for A+, Net+, and Security+ (grab Darill's book) and only take S+. From a DoD standpoint you would fulfill IAT 1 and 2 requirements unless the client dictates otherwise. After that roll, CCENT/CCNA (two exam route).

    Most people might say the CCENT is a waste of time HR wise but in terms of learning the fundamentals, at least for me, the two exam approach let me slow down, lab harder, and pin point and strengthen my weak areas. The two exam approach also costs the same as taking the one exam approach except for the fact that passing ICND2 without passing ICND1 (two exam route) won't give you the full CCNA. The CCNA composite (one exam route) assumes you have a strong grasp of the fundementals of the CCENT and hits the ground running. Statistically you have a better chance at getting your CCNA via the composite route (50 questions vs 100 questions for two tests) but whats passing really worth without full understanding? :)

    At the end of the day, I'm glad I went the two exam route because, as described above, the chance to slow down and really absorb the material has made a world of difference in terms of what I've retained. This is just my two cents and the "CCNA" experience varies from person to person icon_wink.gif.
  • kurosaki00kurosaki00 Member Posts: 973
    You need to know
    IN IT, shortcuts hurt you
    either at the beginning or down the road

    I would never recommend CCNA to anyone that doesnt have somewhat a foundation in networking.
    By hurt I mean when you are in your CCNA job, doing routers and templates and someone comes and ask some basic network question
    or ask you to connect the printer to the network
    and You the Network Admin/Technician dont know, it looks awful.

    Go one step at a time and dont skip the basics.
    I know its more expensive, but with hard work you will get your reward (your job).

    Ive been only working on IT for like 3 years, and only recently in deep networking.
    But this is the opinion I have based on my experience and friends close to me that also work in the field
    meh
  • snokerpokersnokerpoker Member Posts: 661 ■■■■□□□□□□
    kurosaki00 wrote: »
    You need to know
    IN IT, shortcuts hurt you
    either at the beginning or down the road

    I would never recommend CCNA to anyone that doesnt have somewhat a foundation in networking.
    By hurt I mean when you are in your CCNA job, doing routers and templates and someone comes and ask some basic network question
    or ask you to connect the printer to the network
    and You the Network Admin/Technician dont know, it looks awful.

    Go one step at a time and dont skip the basics.
    I know its more expensive, but with hard work you will get your reward (your job).

    Ive been only working on IT for like 3 years, and only recently in deep networking.
    But this is the opinion I have based on my experience and friends close to me that also work in the field

    Very sound and honest advice here.

    It is great to be ambitious and want to get CCNA or into the networking field right away, but realistically your first job(s) will be in a support role. If I were you, I would do Net+ then move on and do a client Microsoft exam (XP or 7). With A+, N +, and a M$ cert under your belt, you will be pretty employable. As you gain more experience,you can continue your studies and get Sec+ and CCENT/CCNA.
  • demonfurbiedemonfurbie Member Posts: 1,819
    if i had to do it again this is the path id take
    a+

    net+
    ccnet
    70-642

    sec+

    70-680
    and rest of mcitp:ea
    wgu undergrad: done ... woot!!
    WGU MS IT Management: done ... double woot :cheers:
  • MrNetTekMrNetTek 41 certificate exams, 51 training certificates, and a bachelor's and master’s degree. Member Posts: 100 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I recommend being diverse right from the beginning. Meaning take one certification from each vendor. Questionalbly the easiest, is a Microsoft MCP of some kind. Then CompTIA, then Cisco (and of course there's plenty of others). If you want to get the most mileage as quick as possible, having certs from each vendor shows your technical aptitude across multiple technologies to potential employers.

    Hopes this helps,

    Eddie Jackson (MrNetTek)
    http://eddiejackson.net
  • Jay The HackerJay The Hacker Registered Users Posts: 8 ■□□□□□□□□□
    i would do Security+ then CCNA

    if u want solid foundation, perhaps this path?
    A+ >>> Linux+ >>> Server+ >>> Security+ >>> CCNA
    (in my opinion, network+ is too easy and expensive for an entry level certificate.)
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