Security Certification Path

Jr.SecAnalystJr.SecAnalyst Registered Users Posts: 2 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hi everyone, I am new to the security field, but have been working in IT for over 2+ years. I come from a Microsoft Systems Administration background. In terms of certifications I currently have MCSE, Security+ and Network+. At my current job I'm a junior security analyst in a SOC, and was looking for some certification paths to take in security. I want to focus on the offensive side. My current plan is to do something like this:

1. WCNA (Wireshark Certified Network Analyst)
2. CEH (Certified Ethical Hacker)
3. eCCPT (Certified Professional Penetration Tester)
4. OSCP (Offensive Security Certified Professional)

This is just a start I guess, afterwards maybe some linux and cisco certs. What do you all think of this path anything to change/remove/add/re-arrange to this list?

Comments

  • the_Grinchthe_Grinch Member Posts: 4,164 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Welcome aboard! I think it will really depend on what the focus of your position will be. Being part of a SOC, you'll definitely want to get to know Wireshark really well. From there, I would focus on Linux because a lot of the tools you are going to use will be on Linux and if you plan to take eCCPT and OSCP having a solid foundation in Linux is a must. I'd look to see if there are an vendor specific certs for the devices that you use to monitor your network. So if your looking for a path, you might want to do it the following way:

    1. Linux+ (or just get a solid working knowledge of Linux)
    2. WCNA
    3. Vendor tools (Cisco, Juniper, Sourcefire)
    3. eCCPT (they cover Network and Systems security, but web applications is a huge part)
    4. OSCP

    Solid foundation on some technologies is where you want to start (you pretty much have it with the MCSE). From there you'll want to really begin studying the concepts and tools of the trade. I am guessing the end goal is to get into pentesting, so you'll want to study the methodology and the documenting process as these are two huge parts of the pentest field. I am sure others will be along to help you further!
    WIP:
    PHP
    Kotlin
    Intro to Discrete Math
    Programming Languages
    Work stuff
  • Jr.SecAnalystJr.SecAnalyst Registered Users Posts: 2 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I will start with Linux+ because I have very little knowledge of Linux OS.
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I think you need to first decide what type of security you want to get into? Systems? Network? Application. Assuming you want to stay with with systems, the path by the grinch is fine.


    On the WCNA just keep in mind that you will need to get a good TCP/IP book in order to really make it worth you while. It doesn't go in depth into the protocols. What's the point of looking at the protocols on the wire if you have no idea what you are looking at :) I am probably going to give it ago in December and there is at least one person on here who has done it:

    http://www.techexams.net/forums/general-certification/64976-wireshark-wcna-anyone-pursuing-got.html

    CCNA and CCNA:Security are good for cisco stuff. Maybe even CCDA if you want to do some security design at some point.

    If your job will pay for it, see if you can get some SANS training.
  • whatthehellwhatthehell Member Posts: 920
    I think you need to first decide what type of security you want to get into? Systems? Network? Application. Assuming you want to stay with with systems, the path by the grinch is fine.


    On the WCNA just keep in mind that you will need to get a good TCP/IP book in order to really make it worth you while. It doesn't go in depth into the protocols. What's the point of looking at the protocols on the wire if you have no idea what you are looking at :) I am probably going to give it ago in December and there is at least one person on here who has done it:

    http://www.techexams.net/forums/general-certification/64976-wireshark-wcna-anyone-pursuing-got.html

    CCNA and CCNA:Security are good for cisco stuff. Maybe even CCDA if you want to do some security design at some point.

    If your job will pay for it, see if you can get some SANS training.

    I keep hearing that this is a pretty good book for TCP/IP knowledge:

    Amazon.com: TCP/IP Illustrated, Vol. 1: The Protocols (Addison-Wesley Professional Computing Series) (9780201633467): W. Stevens: Books

    There is a Vol 2 and 3, but I hear going with Vol 1 is quite sufficient. Gotta get this one myself!

    Any other TCP/IP books you guys recommend?
    2017 Goals:
    [ ] Security + [ ] 74-409 [ ] CEH
    Future Goals:
    TBD
  • Bl8ckr0uterBl8ckr0uter Inactive Imported Users Posts: 5,031 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I own that one and the TCP/IP Guide by No starch press.
  • WhiteGhost33WhiteGhost33 Registered Users Posts: 1 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Hello everyone. I want to become a security professional. I want to investigate computer crimes and find hidden files in computer and other devices. I want to use Encase and Forensic Tool kit what certifications should i start with
  • zrockstarzrockstar Member Posts: 378
    Hello everyone. I want to become a security professional. I want to investigate computer crimes and find hidden files in computer and other devices. I want to use Encase and Forensic Tool kit what certifications should i start with

    You will probably get better responses by creating your own thread instead of resurrecting one that has been down for almost a year. But anyways, to get into that type of work you are likely going to need a bachelor's degree in criminal justice and/or computer science. Look around at some of the security threads on this forum. It seems to me like you have a Hollywood type image of InfoSec, so it would probably do you well by checking out what some of the guys working in the industry have to say. But if that is what you really want to do, you can, but it is going to take some formal education, because there aren't many commercial businesses doing that kind of work, so you are basically shooting for city, state, or ferdal government agencies.
  • docricedocrice Member Posts: 1,706 ■■■■■■■■■■
    The topic of career paths in forensics, etc. has been discussed here before. Your first test to see if you can handle it is to do a search in the appropriate forum here to see if you can find the appropriate threads.
    Hopefully-useful stuff I've written: http://kimiushida.com/bitsandpieces/articles/
  • dmoore44dmoore44 Member Posts: 646
    I own that one and the TCP/IP Guide by No starch press.

    I've got both of those as well. Additionally, I have a copy of the Guide to TCP/IP by Ed Tittel and Laura Chappell - it's a fantastic volume as well (though a little dated). There's supposed to be a new edition coming out next month, which will be awesome.

    Amazon.com: Guide to TCP/IP (9781418837556): Ed Tittel, Laura Chappell: Books
    Graduated Carnegie Mellon University MSIT: Information Security & Assurance Currently Reading Books on TensorFlow
  • Novice-mutantNovice-mutant Registered Users Posts: 4 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Hey! what say about TCP/IP protocol suite forouzan
  • zcarenowzcarenow Member Posts: 110
    what is a good wireshark book from intro to intermediate? how to use it and explaining what we need to do as far as troubleshooting issues of performance on the network? thanks.
  • docricedocrice Member Posts: 1,706 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Actually, yes, I forgot about that book. I've skimmed through my copy and it's not bad for starters.
    Hopefully-useful stuff I've written: http://kimiushida.com/bitsandpieces/articles/
Sign In or Register to comment.