Certs in Email Signature

f0rgiv3nf0rgiv3n Posts: 594Member ■■■■□□□□□□
It's always been a conflict for me of whether or not I should put my certs in my email signature. At this point, I rarely use my signature that has them in there. What others do out there? Do you separate it out like "inside company email = no certs" "outside = certs"?


I'm curious of the opinions out there.
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Comments

  • earweedearweed Posts: 5,192Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    If it was CCIE,PMP, or another similar designation which is expected in a signature. As far as certs like CCNA, MCSE, or ANYTHING CompTIA (except maybe trainer, if that was my job) I would leave them off.
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • f0rgiv3nf0rgiv3n Posts: 594Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    I'm in agreement with that one earweed. I've seen some others though with quite a few certs in their signature that made me go O_o
  • f0rgiv3nf0rgiv3n Posts: 594Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    ah HA! I knew there had to be a few out there, thanks for the linkage cyberguypr.
  • lsud00dlsud00d Posts: 1,571Member
    I agree with earweed as well...if you have an advanced degree or certification, that's fine.

    However I have always been a fan of minimal email sigs...it's a pet peeve of mine when someone is like

    Full name
    Title
    Company
    Address line 1
    Address line 2
    Address line 3
    Phone
    Fax
    Cell
    Home
    Beeper
    cheesy quote
  • f0rgiv3nf0rgiv3n Posts: 594Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    [email protected] quote. It's so funny when that's in there with a large font, italicized and in a different color :)
  • ptilsenptilsen Posts: 2,835Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    CISSP, CCIE, MCM, PMP, and graduate degrees. Even then, I would go with your particular organization's culture. As far as outside, I would say no credentials in email signature unless you are a consultant. Nothing around the MCSE/CCNP level or below under any circumstances.
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  • ClaymooreClaymoore Posts: 1,637Member
    I am a consultant and my company has an email signature template that we are required to use. Certifications are part of that template, but I keep it simple on one line by only listing MCITP/MCSE level with abbreviations. If they can't figure out what the abbreviations mean, I doubt the full title will mean anything to them. Fortunately, I haven't seen anyone here use the logo builder and include the cert logos in their signature. We have some people who list a few specific MCTS if it is important to their role, but I don't do that. I don't even list all my certs on my resume so I am certainly not putting them in every email.
  • earweedearweed Posts: 5,192Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    Claymoore wrote: »
    . I don't even list all my certs on my resume so I am certainly not putting them in every email.

    But then again, most of us, unlike you, wouldn't have a mult-ipage cert list section on their resume..
    No longer work in IT. Play around with stuff sometimes still and fix stuff for friends and relatives.
  • ougijoeougijoe Posts: 37Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    earweed wrote: »
    If it was CCIE,PMP, or another similar designation which is expected in a signature. As far as certs like CCNA, MCSE, or ANYTHING CompTIA (except maybe trainer, if that was my job) I would leave them off.

    Completely agree.
  • YuckTheFankeesYuckTheFankees Posts: 1,281Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    ougijoe wrote: »
    Completely agree.

    ^.. but I would also slip in my CIW certs as well. icon_cheers.gif
  • the_Grinchthe_Grinch Posts: 4,134Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    I don't do it. My reasoning is it was annoying to see when I worked with healthcare clients. I have nothing to prove to anyone so why include them? I saw nurses who would have RN, ASN, BSN, MSN, <specialization> and generally the more after their name the more of a pain they were. We get it, you're a nurse, let it go.
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  • AkaricloudAkaricloud Posts: 938Member
    lsud00d wrote: »
    I agree with earweed as well...if you have an advanced degree or certification, that's fine.

    However I have always been a fan of minimal email sigs...it's a pet peeve of mine when someone is like

    Full name
    Title
    Company
    Address line 1
    Address line 2
    Address line 3
    Phone
    Fax
    Cell
    Home
    Beeper
    cheesy quote

    The company I work for just made it a requirement that we have a signature like this and attach a vCard. Additionally we attach 6 images to all of our social media pages. 9 out of 10 times my signature is longer than the emails I send and it's absolutely horrible on our exchange storage.

    I'm of the opinion that signatures should be short, simple and relevant to anyone who might read them. In certain IT positions high-level certifications may fit into this but most of the time that isn't the case.
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    My boss has his PMP and told me to get my RMP in my signature block. First time I ever put a certification in a workplace signature block. He asked me to put my ITIL in there too, but I couldn't stomach seeing two certs in there.

    For me it's one certification and when I get my MBA that will replace my RMP. More than one just looks extremely cheesy to me.
  • YFZbluYFZblu Posts: 1,462Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Certain departments in our organization do it. The other day, I saw a Desktop Support guy's signature - It featured A+, Net+, Sec+, Linux+, Apple, Solaris, AND each certification's corresponding logo. I nearly died...

    Anyway, I used to put multiple certs in my email signature because my boss asked me to. In my new role I don't put any. I might toss one or two security-related certs in there when I get some that I'm really proud of.
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Posts: 1,945Member
    I don't list any now and never have. If I start consulting again and complete something higher level like the CISSP or update my CCEA and MCSE I may.
    Andy

    2017 Goals: 1 of 5 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • Node ManNode Man Posts: 668Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    i dont use it in a signature. but i do keep a framed copy of my cert on my desk. i always see myself smiling in the reflection on the glass icon_smile.gif
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAPosts: 4,114Mod Mod
    HAhahaha... my consultant email address has everything except the CCAs and CIWs. I really have been meaning to change it for some time. Thanks for reminding me, guys!
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
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  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Posts: 6,721Mod Mod
    I can imagine the signature:

    Iristheangel
    IT Consultant
    (123) 456-7890
    [email protected]
    CISSP, CEH, CCNA:S/V, MCSE:S, MCDST, A/S/L/P/N+, and some useless Citrix and CIW certs

    icon_smile.gif
  • paulgswansonpaulgswanson Posts: 311Member
    I only use my Cert sig when I need to put someone in their place. ;) Happanes quite often where I work.
    http://paulswansonblog.wordpress.com/
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  • crashdumpcrashdump Posts: 134Banned
    I don't own very valuable certs. If I would own, I would put in signature :)
  • TrashmanTrashman Posts: 140Member
    I don't understand why everything has to be CCIE or MCSE in order to be mentioned.
    I'd say it depends on your situation.

    If you work for a big ISP then perhaps not, but if you run your own business or work for a small company, why not.
    It's all about selling yourself.

    Customers won't dig into your resume.
    Bachelor of Science in Information Systems
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  • docricedocrice Posts: 1,706Member
    I'm not a fan of "signature bloat," especially when resellers send me email. It's not necessarily just the certification letters after their names, but also banners which no doubt increases the inbox-consuming size of the message and the resulting vertical high-heeling when parsing through an email thread. Anything that artificially increases scroll-time gets credibility point reductions from me.

    I understand it if you're a consultant or trainer or in a position to demonstrate-your-qualifications as a reseller, but I've worked with enough "certified professionals" to know that "John Smith, CCNA, CCNP, MCITP: EA, CISSP, CEH" probably won't be able to get the answer that I'm looking for on the first try. It's almost akin to trying too hard to prove yourself or ego up-sizing.

    On a business cards, I think the certification alphabet is fine for resellers and consulting groups. But if you make me work harder just to read email, I'm going to get impatient really fast.
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  • GoodBishopGoodBishop Posts: 359Member
    f0rgiv3n wrote: »
    It's always been a conflict for me of whether or not I should put my certs in my email signature. At this point, I rarely use my signature that has them in there. What others do out there? Do you separate it out like "inside company email = no certs" "outside = certs"?


    I'm curious of the opinions out there.
    I try to keep it to 3 certs, and I put the CISSP and two of my ISACA certs on my signature. People can always look me up and find out the additional certs.

    Although, I have 4 different email signatures, and the only difference is the certifications listed. So say I want to talk to the Legal department about privacy issues, then I put CISSP, CIPP/US, CIPP/IT. Say I want to talk to Internal Audit, then it is CISSP, CISA, CRISC. Say I want to talk to the security department, then I put CISSP, CISM, CGEIT. I tailor the certs to the audience that I am typing my email to.

    The question is why do I do this though. Well, certifications give you creditability in a area... at least, the good ones do (aka I would hope a PMP would know how to run a project. :) ). Putting them on a email signature gives you that creditability for folks who you haven't met, like a random lawyer who you are working with to address technology issues. Plus, honestly, there aren't a lot of folks with certifications out there.

    Most of the time, I just put my name at the end, no certs. It's faster that way. There are also times when I need to lay the hammer down that I put my signature in too.
  • GoodBishopGoodBishop Posts: 359Member
    And yeah, it's text only. No images. Keep it simple.
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    cyberguypr wrote: »
    I can imagine the signature:

    Iristheangel
    IT Consultant
    (123) 456-7890
    [email protected]
    CISSP, CEH, CCNA:S/V, MCSE:S, MCDST, A/S/L/P/N+, and some useless Citrix and CIW certs

    icon_smile.gif

    Wow I just spit up soda all over my keyboard. :)
  • TechGromitTechGromit A+, N+, GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Posts: 1,879Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    I currently do not have any certifications listed on my email signature, I was considering adding my A+, but I don't think everyone would appreciate my sense of humor. I agree that adding too many certifications to your email signature is overkill, but when I obtain my CISSP I think I'll add it to my email signature. I do not think I currently possess any certification's impressive enough to list at the moment.

    P.S. Yes I know this is an old thread, I did a search for it to add my two cents to this topic, instead of starting yet another thread on the same topic.
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • RepliconReplicon Posts: 124Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I keep mine in the signature, I like them being after my name but dislike having logos and quotes in the signature, though I fear sometimes that some senior executives might take it the wrong way that I wan't to look like smart ass, considering I am more certified than my seniors
  • xxxkaliboyxxxxxxkaliboyxxx Posts: 466Member
    Do you put all of your certs?
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  • Mike7Mike7 Posts: 1,061Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    TechGromit wrote: »
    I do not think I currently possess any certification's impressive enough to list at the moment.
    Even if you do, you may not want to list them unless you want to drive home a point.

    I have 2 email signatures in my Outlook; the standard one with my job title, contact details, legal disclaimers and no certifications, and one with the trinity of CISSP,CISA,CISM certs listed. I call it trinity as some job postings explicitly requires for either one or all of the 3 certs.

    I tend not to use signatures except when corresponding formally with external parties and usually use the signature without certs. I am ambivalent about certs in email signature especially with someone who is not a customer; it's kinda of show-off. A simple email concluded with my name is good enough

    For emails with customers, listing the appropriate certs gives you some credibility.

    No certs for emails with internal users and vendors; they can find it on my LinkedIn. A colleauge stumbled onto my LinkedIn profile list of certifications and my colleagues could not stop talking about them for months. I would not say I have an impressive list rather that I just happened to have more certs than them. Guess they were both impressed and slightly envious. icon_redface.gif It may go the wrong way; they see you as a competitor out to take over their jobs and make things difficult for you. Luckily it turned out well.
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