Hobbies, Friends, Family, Exercise, etc

JackaceJackace Posts: 335Member
I'm only finishing up my CCNP studies now, and hope to begin the CCIE studies next year. I have noticed though that maintaining relationships with family and friends, keeping up with hobbies, and exercising regularly gets tough when you spend so much time studying. I know I'm going to have to take it up another notch if I want to get the CCIE. My question for those of you doing it or those that have done it, how did you keep a decent balance in life?

I am only at the CCNP level right now, but I find that I don't do many of the hobbies I once did, I can go weeks/months without seeing friends and family because I just get so caught up in work and studying, and I have gained probably 35 pounds since I started studying for the CCNP. Don't get me wrong I really enjoy networking and it is very interesting to me, but at the same time I want to be able to maintain relationships with those I care about and remain healthy. How have some of you accomplished this balancing act?

Comments

  • webgeekwebgeek Posts: 495Member
    It's called multitasking. While I have been stuck in your position before, I've always taken a few days or weeks off just to let the brain relax by seeing movies, playing on Live, going out with friends, or taking my dogs to the park.

    Remember Rule #32 (Zombieland) - Enjoy the little things
    BS in IT: Information Assurance and Security (Capella) ETA 2013/Early 2014
    2013 Goals: CISSP [:cheers:] ITIL Foundations [ ] Project+ [ ] Linux+ [ ] CCNA (Maybe) [ ]
  • JackaceJackace Posts: 335Member
    I never had trouble with Multitasking in school or during my CCNA studies, but once I started down the CCNP path I found I spent a lot of time researching why things worked the way they worked and it just took a lot of my free time. I can only imagine it will get worse once I dig into the CCIE topics.
  • webgeekwebgeek Posts: 495Member
    Setup a schedule...this is what I have done for time management. I also set in place days off where I just relax, order some pizza, and watch something on Hulu/Netflix/Amazon.
    BS in IT: Information Assurance and Security (Capella) ETA 2013/Early 2014
    2013 Goals: CISSP [:cheers:] ITIL Foundations [ ] Project+ [ ] Linux+ [ ] CCNA (Maybe) [ ]
  • tigerplugtigerplug Posts: 40Member ■■□□□□□□□□
  • log32log32 Posts: 217Users Awaiting Email Confirmation
    Brain researches claim there's no such thing as multi tasking, only a really fast single task switching.
  • AhriakinAhriakin SupremeNetworkOverlord Posts: 1,800Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    It depends on your definition of balance, and whether you see it over the long term or not. If you mean to reach equilibrium in real-time then that's not really possible. as you know the CCIE requires intense study that will force you to sacrifice other things to achieve, to succeed it will have to be lopsided (but not completely so, you will need cool-off days...there just won't be many). However if you take the longer term view it should advance your career to the point where it should enable a higher quality of life for you, and if needs be your family and friends (it doesn't hurt in this day and age to be in a position to help loved ones when they need it).
    The real problem is that as you move up the career ladder your responsibilities (and stress) will increase, hopefully along with your compensation, but your choices will change to just how well do you want to do vs. recovering the things you have had to put by in order to get to where you are. It's one thing not to sprint full out because you aren't in a position to yet and another to be the type of person that can and wants to but knows that they are going to hurt themselves if they keep doing it (if that makes sense?).

    Personally I'm coming out of a 7 year cert and career race. I'm tired, I've put on weight and lost track of some things I love in the process. I wouldn't go back and change it, I accept the cost as it has gotten me to the point where I have relatively comfortable choices, but I'm ready to start getting some of that back. This is where/when balance is being addressed.....I hope :)
    We responded to the Year 2000 issue with "Y2K" solutions...isn't this the kind of thinking that got us into trouble in the first place?
  • jamesp1983jamesp1983 Posts: 2,475Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    I really miss regular, intense exercise. I work two jobs and am studying for this cert so a lot has been sacrificed for my pursuit.
    "Check both the destination and return path when a route fails." "Switches create a network. Routers connect networks."
  • JackaceJackace Posts: 335Member
    Ahriakin wrote: »
    Personally I'm coming out of a 7 year cert and career race. I'm tired, I've put on weight and lost track of some things I love in the process.

    Between going back to school and pushing certs I'm up to almost 5 years now of pushing to learn things as quick as possible. I know I need to complete the CCIE to really finish off my studies and help my career, but at the same time I have let a lot of things slip in my personal life as well. I'm hoping to take a little break before I start the CCIE push, but even with that I would like to keep as much balance as possible once I do make the push.
  • mhonskymhonsky Posts: 47Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Reading Hrs for Lab:60
    Lab Hrs: 200

    Goal 2013: CCIE R&S ( ) | ITILv3 Foundation ( )
  • Mike-MikeMike-Mike Posts: 1,860Member
    Ahriakin wrote: »
    Personally I'm coming out of a 7 year cert and career race. I'm tired, I've put on weight and lost track of some things I love in the process.

    A little over 3 years for me, and I'm getting pretty burnt
    Currently Working On

    CWTS, then WireShark
  • SteveO86SteveO86 Posts: 1,423Member
    It's all about balance, I've been tackling my career head first for at least 4-5 years now always studying for something.

    i still find time to hang out with friends (Friday, Saturday night type deal), read a good sci-if book, the occasial computer game (TF2 or L4D2) with close friends mainly for the voice chat then the game, amd still hit the gym for an hour (i have missed a few workouts though). just remember you have to have balance and my balance is tipped toward the CCIE right now(getting in about 5 study hours a day after work). I have some other friends studying for their CCIE so it's also a social thing to lol. However after a few weeks of cramming you just need to go out and have a few drinks with friends.

    so it can take over your life and burn you out but you need to make sure you maintain a healthy balanced lifestyle for your own sake.
    My Networking blog
    Latest blog post: Let's review EIGRP Named Mode
    Currently Studying: CCNP: Wireless - IUWMS
  • jibbajabbajibbajabba Posts: 4,317Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Guess this is why some people study a long long time for the CCIE ..
    My own knowledge base made public: http://open902.com :p
  • jamesp1983jamesp1983 Posts: 2,475Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    mhonsky wrote: »

    That is an excellent book. It will definitely clarify a lot for you.
    "Check both the destination and return path when a route fails." "Switches create a network. Routers connect networks."
  • JackaceJackace Posts: 335Member
    mhonsky wrote: »


    Thanks for that link. I will take a look at that book.
  • rinoelrinoel Posts: 39Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    mhonsky wrote: »

    Personally I'm very satisfied with all the info and suggestions from this book, it's worth the money.
  • RouteMyPacketRouteMyPacket Posts: 1,104Member
    I don't even want to begin on this subject. I haven't set foot in a gym since February.

    Work->Study->Sleep rinse and repeat
    Modularity and Design Simplicity:

    Think of the 2:00 a.m. test—if you were awakened in the
    middle of the night because of a network problem and had to figure out the
    traffic flows in your network while you were half asleep, could you do it?
  • aaron0011aaron0011 Posts: 330Member
    Work to live, don't live for work.
  • PsychoFinPsychoFin Posts: 280Member
    mhonsky wrote: »

    That book is indeed excellent! I've had it for somettime and still enjoy reading various chapters from it. Discusses the mental and social aspect of the ccie preparation that other books don't touch on.
  • instant000instant000 Posts: 1,745Member
    In my personal experience, I perform better when I balance things out.

    When I'm well-rested and exercise, as well as do a focused study schedule each day, I'm better off overall.

    When I try to cram it in, I tend to go overboard, and wear myself out. I then have to make-up sleep, make-up study, and things go haywire and I actually fall behind in my goals.

    This may sound weird, but the best thing I can advise is to "limit" your study hours to a certain number, and quit it at that point. Then, you can focus on it during its time, but not let it take over your life.

    Also, take at least one day off a week.

    The more you learn, the more you realize what you don't know, and it should help you to maintain a certain sense of humility -- if not just to realize that you won't ever know it all.

    Hope this helps.
    Currently Working: CCIE R&S
    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lewislampkin (Please connect: Just say you're from TechExams.Net!)
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