Where should I start

mr.robomr.robo Registered Users Posts: 4 ■□□□□□□□□□
Morning everyone, since this is my first post it would be bad not to give a introduction of myself. I graduated high school about one year ago and with the help of CLEP credits I am currently a junior in college studying Police Science. I wanted to get into information security and I need your advice. I want to know if the Security+ could be done as the first exam ever taken if not where should I start if I wanted to go into the info sec. I also wanted to know if (CBT or TrainSignal) is better between the two while also using Gibson's 301 book to reference it. I am not a total beginner when it comes to computers, I have built computers and worked on robotics(High School level) but I don't know where that info would add in (No experience in networks). Thanks for any information. (Also I know that some certs need full time experience and I do not have anything of that nature). In addition does one take the CHFI first then the CEH or is it the other way around?

- Mr.Robo or Tony

(I am also sorry if this is a redundant question that members of this forum have to go though ever so often and sorry for any spelling issues.)

Comments

  • Master Of PuppetsMaster Of Puppets Member Posts: 1,210
    Sec+ does not have any prerequisites. It is recommended that you have 2 years of experience but I don't think anyone listens to that specific recommendation :D If you don't know anything about networks then I think it is necessary to start with N+. Get a job, learn more. You can't do security if you don't know how things work. Learn the basics first and go for security after that. Leave CEH and CHFI for later.

    Also, why do you want to do security and what do you think you will be doing?
    Yes, I am a criminal. My crime is that of curiosity. My crime is that of judging people by what they say and think, not what they look like. My crime is that of outsmarting you, something that you will never forgive me for.
  • NytrocideNytrocide Member Posts: 225
    I'd also like to know this. I'm not sure on what path to take, networking or security. I figured getting my CCNA will at least give me a basic understanding of some paths in networking, but unsure on security.

    I was thinking of going for my Security+, or is there another entry level cert with more "oomph"?
    Goals for 2014: CCNA: Voice / CCNA: Security
  • Master Of PuppetsMaster Of Puppets Member Posts: 1,210
    Get to know the field, learn a bit so you can see what it really is and what interests you. Don't just go for security because it seems cool and everybody's doing it. Getting your CCNA is a great idea. Have a sense of the different realms of networking first and then see what you like. Security is a big black mysterious box to a lot of people but for some unknown to them reason, they want to get into it.
    Yes, I am a criminal. My crime is that of curiosity. My crime is that of judging people by what they say and think, not what they look like. My crime is that of outsmarting you, something that you will never forgive me for.
  • mr.robomr.robo Registered Users Posts: 4 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the reply Nytro and Master of Puppets. Master to answer your question I am trying to go into law enforcement but hopefully after a few years I can go into a unit or a division that deals with either computer(cyber) crimes or digital forensics.
  • Master Of PuppetsMaster Of Puppets Member Posts: 1,210
    mr.robo wrote: »
    Thanks for the reply Nytro and Master of Puppets. Master to answer your question I am trying to go into law enforcement but hopefully after a few years I can go into a unit or a division that deals with either computer(cyber) crimes or digital forensics.

    To get into forensics, you need to have very strong analytical skills. Primarily, this is what you will be doing. Also, a strong understanding of networks and the protocols inside them. It involves constantly asking WHY. For example, why is this code written like that and placed here and not there? Coding is important.Being familiar with the ins and outs of operating systems so that you know how to extract data from them is vital. So you have to extract the data and make it so that it can be analysed. This is often harder than it looks. Cyber criminals make deliberate efforts to make this as hard as possible and they put a lot of work into it. Usually, very experienced people do forensics. You don't need a degree, you can succeed without it but one won't hurt. It goes without saying that a strong knowledge of the laws of the area/state in question is needed.

    This is what I can tell you off the top of my head, hope it helps. Maybe others can add something.
    Yes, I am a criminal. My crime is that of curiosity. My crime is that of judging people by what they say and think, not what they look like. My crime is that of outsmarting you, something that you will never forgive me for.
  • the_Grinchthe_Grinch Member Posts: 4,164 ■■■■■■■■■■
    If your looking to do forensics, your best bet is to get into law enforcement (as an officer, agent, whatever your aim) or to apply when the FBI posts for forensic analysts. In my searches, aside from Transperfect, I haven't seen any entry level forensics positions besides the FBI. They'll require a degree and then will put you through all the required training. Honestly the hardest part is getting the law and procedure side down. The money is when you can testify in court about findings.

    In regards to certs, Security+ is definitely a good place to start. I'd definitely skip CHFI because no one recognizes it. For forensics you'll want to aim for vendor level certs (BKForensics, EnCase, etc). CEH is not a huge deal in forensics, but it has a name. I'll say I felt it was a waste and it never got me anywhere.

    If I were you I would get a degree, preferably in Computer Science or IS with a programming slant. Do a concentration in forensics and do an internship for an agency. The FBI has regional forensic labs throughout the country so look for one in your area. If not that, it seems most agencies use the county or state level for their forensics unless they are a big city department (NYC, Chicago, LA, etc). I was in law enforcement for a few years and have a lot of contacts I keep in touch with. Most say they can teach you the law, it's the computer side they have issue getting people for. At ICE, the forensics side was a collateral duty with only a few offices having anyone actually assigned to doing the job full time. Good luck, get in shape, and keep that background clean.
    WIP:
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  • mr.robomr.robo Registered Users Posts: 4 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for all the input it is very helpful. Also Grinch, I am gonna stay in my major it makes no sense to make the change I would be rolling back 30 credits if I were to switch to a IT major. I'm only one year left (Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall Semester no breaks..) for my B.S so I might go and do a masters in digital forensics at CUNY.
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