Education path?

twofingeredtwofingered Member Posts: 12 ■□□□□□□□□□
I am relatively new to the IT field, with about two years of Windows support experience, and about a year of schooling. I have a "dream job" that I wish to reach, and I would like to study some things to prepare me for that job, as well as expand my skill set. The requirements for that job are:
- Basic understanding of some of the following protocols and applications:
- NFS, the UNIX remote file sharing protocol
- CIFS, the Windows NT remote file sharing protocol
- TCP/IP
- Networking
- RAID
- Microsoft Exchange and/or Veritas software.
- Strong aptitude for learning new technologies and understanding how to utilize them in a customer facing environment.
- Ability to follow standard engineering principles and practices.
- Creative approach to problem solving.
- Must have at least 1 or more areas of expertise such as: backup and recovery, Exchange DR, Veritas, Lotus Notes, Linux, AIX, or networking; including at least 2 years of experience working in that particular specialty.

Assuming I have no certifications, is there a particular certification path I could follow? I was going to start with Network+ to show a basic understanding of it, but from there, I was a bit confused. Is there a cert that covers RAID, NFS, CIFS, etc?

Comments

  • instant000instant000 Member Posts: 1,745
    I am relatively new to the IT field, with about two years of Windows support experience, and about a year of schooling. I have a "dream job" that I wish to reach, and I would like to study some things to prepare me for that job, as well as expand my skill set. The requirements for that job are:



    Assuming I have no certifications, is there a particular certification path I could follow? I was going to start with Network+ to show a basic understanding of it, but from there, I was a bit confused. Is there a cert that covers RAID, NFS, CIFS, etc?

    Try the CompTIA Storage +:
    CompTIA Storage+ certification, SNIA certification

    Of course, you could learn this stuff without certs. I'll be back post-break to post more comprehensively.
    Currently Working: CCIE R&S
    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lewislampkin (Please connect: Just say you're from TechExams.Net!)
  • instant000instant000 Member Posts: 1,745
    If you're already doing Network+, you could continue down that track and make it an area of expertise.
    I would recommend that having fewer areas of expertise would help you better than trying to do everything. Don't get me wrong. I'm not saying to be ignorant of everything else, but I am saying to be careful of what you focus on, as you can't do it all.

    I can give you a plan to get to that job, but I'd like to give you a track even better than that:
    I want to see you BEYOND that job.

    Current Job: Helpdesk
    Current education: 1 Year of schooling
    Current cert: None

    Target1: That job (Jack of All Trades), looks like a basic server administrator.
    Target2: Guru
    Key Traits: Networking, Messaging, Windows, Linux (based on the job description you gave)

    How to build them:
    Networking: Theory, Hands-On
    Messaging: Theory, Hands-On
    Windows: Theory, Hands-On
    Linux: Theory, Hands-On

    OK, here we go. whatever track you choose, you would go from theory to hands on. I recommend working on one track, if you have one that you like above others. Even "dream job" you post above only requires expertise in one area. I'll make several tracks. Others more experienced can chime in to support.

    I like to think of the candidate in three layers:
    Certification, Education, and Experience. As you build the credentials and network, the opportunities will present themselves. Be ready for them. Just pick out a left to right track and go for it. Experience is king. Certification helps you hone some specific skills. Education provides solid foundation for success.

    Experience:
    Networking: Help Desk > Junior Network Engineer > Network Engineer > Lead Network Engineer > The Manager/Independent Consultant
    Messaging: Help Desk > Junior Server Administrator > Messaging Engineer > Lead Messaging Engineer > The Manager/Independent Consultant
    Windows: Help Desk > Junior Server Administrator > Server Administrator > Lead Server Administrator > The Manager/Independent Consultant
    Linux: Help Desk > Junior Server Administrator > Server Administrator > Lead Server Administrator > The Manager/Independent Consultant

    Certification:
    Networking: Network+ > CCENT > CCNA > CCNP > CCIE
    Messaging: Server+ > MCSA:2012 > MCSE:Messaging > MCSM:Messaging
    Windows: Server+ > MCSA:2012 > MCSE:Server Infrastructure > MCSM: Directory Services
    Linux: Linux+ > RHCSA > RHCE > RHCA

    Education:
    I recommend basically three education tracks, depending on how much you can stand to go to school.
    Track 1: BS
    Track 2: BS > MBA
    Track 3: BS > MS w/ Topical focus (e.g. networking, information systems, etc.) > MBA

    Note: This is not 100% inflexible. Adjust as you see fit. Also, this is based on how I've seen things in my own career. Your results may vary. For example, I believe that one would be a server administrator prior to becoming a messaging engineer (but I could be very wrong, as that's only how it worked in my own experience). Some people want to be the boss within a company. Others may want to be the boss in their own company. Truth be told, I have met some who have branched out at what I would consider the "junior level" that I consider successful independent consultants, so don't follow this strict pathing if it is not working for you.

    Hope this helps.
    Currently Working: CCIE R&S
    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lewislampkin (Please connect: Just say you're from TechExams.Net!)
  • SharkDiverSharkDiver Member Posts: 844
    +1
    Thanks instant001
  • jmfdjmfd Member Posts: 30 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Awesome reply Instant001.

    I found that insanely useful.
    WGU B.S.I.T. - Information Security | Completed January 2016
  • twofingeredtwofingered Member Posts: 12 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Slow clap. That was a very detailed and helpful response.

    Even if I am not focusing on Networking, is it still work it to get a basic Networking+ cert? I have a friend who works in the company, and he said that they have just started using some Cisco technology with their own personal technology. He said a basic understanding of Networking concepts would be handy. Does Network+ fill that, or is there a low-level Cisco cert that fills that niche?
  • widget101widget101 Member Posts: 29 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I haven't taken the CCENT yet, but from what I understand, it covers Network+ and a bit more. I could be wrong, though. Someone else here could probably verify that for sure. I have heard the new curriculum is more rigorous and inclusive than the old one.
  • instant000instant000 Member Posts: 1,745
    widget101 wrote: »
    I haven't taken the CCENT yet, but from what I understand, it covers Network+ and a bit more. I could be wrong, though. Someone else here could probably verify that for sure. I have heard the new curriculum is more rigorous and inclusive than the old one.

    Yeah, if you took CCENT, Network+ would be redundant.

    There is even one below CCENT, if you want to take it that far, CCT.

    Here is a chart comparing the CCT to the CCENT.
    http://www.cisco.com/web/learning/le31/le46/cln/pdf/CCT_vs_CCENT_Skill_Set_Comparison.pdf

    Here's Cisco's certificaton page. Get an overview here, starting at CCT.
    https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/community/certifications/cct

    Hope this helps.
    Currently Working: CCIE R&S
    LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/lewislampkin (Please connect: Just say you're from TechExams.Net!)
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