I want to start a Career in IT

keven702keven702 Posts: 6Member ■□□□□□□□□□
Hey guys , I have a associates degree in Liberal Arts and currently working towards becoming a physical therapist but my

parents lost their jobs so , I am interested in starting a career in IT mainly for job opportunities and a good paying job. I've been

reading on IT certs and what I should get but frankly I'm overwhelmed .I reside in NYC and I am and wondering what is a high in

demand and also well paying job/ career I can pursue , for example : Cisco, Microsoft, etc...


I am planning on getting my A+ and Network+ as a start but classes are around 2.5k each, not mentioning the test fee. You

think its a good idea to take the classes or am I going to be ok with a textbook and a practice test?

Comments

  • CodyFCodyF Posts: 16Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Hi there!
    The certifications you end up pursuing will revolve mostly around what you actually want to do. If you're more interested in network administration, you might decide to go for the CompTIA Network+, or Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certifications. If you would rather work with end users (the people who make use of computers and resources), getting Microsoft certified is a good idea. Further, if you want a career securing existing networks, certifications like CISSP, C|EH, and CHFI will be what you would aim for.

    If you're really not sure what you want to do, the CompTIA A+, Network+, and Security+ are usually a great way to get into the field. Courses are expensive, but you can buy self-study materials which are far cheaper. Having an instructor is a huge benefit for most people but, if you can study on your own, you'll save a lot of money.
  • BokehBokeh Posts: 1,636Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    Totally agree with Cody. get a couple of A+ books to start. Read them while watch the videos (FREE) at professormesser.com . If you have questions on what you are reading, google it and if still confused, ask on here. Everyone will be happy to help you. Good luck!
  • Snow.brosSnow.bros Posts: 832Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    I also echo @Codyf and @Bokeh's opinion on in this situation, many people in this forum studied on their own they also achieved so many certs in their career you don't really need an instructor to provide you with training to get you certified, there are other option you take than spending a fortune on one course but instead you can watch free Prof. Messor videos on you tube, if you have any question with regards to any cert you are pursuing you can ask it hear on this forum someone will surely help you, so what you need to do is get yourself a self-paced training kit on A+ and after that you might have a clear mind on which IT career route you want to take.
  • keven702keven702 Posts: 6Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    alright , just bought some A+ study material . What is the difference between taking the Microsoft route or the Cisco route. I know I am probably going to do networking or database because I have no experience or motivation to do developing.


    Which way would land me a good paying job faster? Microsoft or Cisco ( Im located in NYC)
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Posts: 6,844Mod Mod
    Welcome aboard. You mention you are looking into IT for the job outlook and the pay, but be sure you really like. The interwebs are filled with stories from folks who got into IT for the money, glory, and girls (yeah right) just to realize later on that it wasn't what they thought. Just make sure you can deal with the long hours, constant learning, and all the other issues that may come along. I maybe wrong, but I'm getting a vibe that you are putting too much emphasis on the "good paying job." Wrong approach if you ask me.

    The best piece of advice I have for you is to take your time and not rush into anything. Some places will "guarantee" you get certified if you take their classes, at a ridiculous price, but reality is that you don't need that. You can complete many certifications, from entry level to highly specialized ones, exclusively via self study. This will save you thousands of dollars you can spend elsewhere. I understand self study is not for everyone but if you are disciplined you should have no problem.

    Another key element is that you should start with the basics. This means forgetting about CISSP and other higher level certs for now. As others suggested a good starting point is the CompTIA family of certifications, specifically A+ (focuses on hardware/software) and Network+.

    Last but not least, don't forget to ask questions here. Best of luck in your journey!
  • loxleynewloxleynew Posts: 405Member
    keven702 wrote: »
    alright , just bought some A+ study material . What is the difference between taking the Microsoft route or the Cisco route. I know I am probably going to do networking or database because I have no experience or motivation to do developing.


    Which way would land me a good paying job faster? Microsoft or Cisco ( Im located in NYC)

    You can also do systems administration which is where the microsoft certs lead you to and that isn't developing. If you like to deal with people more then this would be the route you would go. You can also mix in DB work with sys admin work at smaller companies.

    If you want to go networking get your network + then work on your CCENT or CCNA and go for a NOC job at an isp. Your network + is a good basis and should be pretty fast to get. The faster route to a better paying job if that is what you are after is going networking and getting a job at a NOC and moving up from there. The key is to not slack and go for your CCNA as soon as possible while getting experience. In general it will take a few years to break the 20$ per hour mark even if motivated.
  • redzredz CISSP-ISSAP, ISSEP, ISSMP, CAP (& others) Posts: 265Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    cyberguypr wrote: »
    I maybe wrong, but I'm getting a vibe that you are putting too much emphasis on the "good paying job." Wrong approach if you ask me.

    I entirely agree with Cyber, and as an addendum, would like to add that you won't be able to get a good paying job early, even if you're a computer prodigy. You have to work your way up, like any other profession. You can do it faster in IT than some other professions if you are dedicated to it, and the ceiling may be higher than physical therapist (outside, perhaps, top tier sports stuff - but I doubt ALL DAY or RGIII are letting someone with five years experience even look upon their knees in person, no matter how good they are).

    You're looking at 1-2 years before getting decent money, if you're dedicated. You're looking at 2-3 more before getting a good money, again, if you're dedicated. You're looking at 6-10 years experience, a bachelors degree, and expert level certifications before you get to the aforementioned money/glory/girls triple play - and that's if you're working your tail off for those six years to get better.

    EDIT: Whatever your reasons, I - and the rest of the TE community - are here to help. I don't want to come off as antagonistic, but you may need to temper your expectations, just a bit.
  • CodyFCodyF Posts: 16Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    keven702 wrote: »
    alright , just bought some A+ study material . What is the difference between taking the Microsoft route or the Cisco route. I know I am probably going to do networking or database because I have no experience or motivation to do developing.


    Which way would land me a good paying job faster? Microsoft or Cisco ( Im located in NYC)

    The Cisco and Microsoft tracks are pretty different. Cisco focuses entirely on the underlying functions of networks. You deal more with routers, switches, and cables more than you do with software like Microsoft. Getting cisco certified is great if you want to work at a data center, and can also be good in the cyber security field (people who know networking and security are highly valued).

    Microsoft's certification path has a lot to it, so again, it really depends on what you want to do. End user support (helpdesk) would probably lead you down the Desktop path, most likely starting with MCSA: Windows 7 (or icon_cool.gif. Microsoft also offers Server and SQL Server certifications for DBA's and network administrators, and there is an entire path dedicated to software development.

    Here are some links detailing the different paths for each vendor:
    Microsoft Certifications:
    IT Certifications | MCP | Microsoft Learning

    Cisco Certifications/CCNA:
    CCNA Routing and Switching - IT Certifications and Career Paths - Cisco Systems

    CompTIA Certifications:
    CompTIA certification - IT certifications
  • keven702keven702 Posts: 6Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Yea, Im not looking for a hand me out and a 100k job off the bat. By decent I'm talking around 50-70k. Thanks for the help so far guys.


    I looked online for jobs but in the job description i don't see CCNA or MCSA as a requirement .
    Do you guys know the name of the jobs I should apply for ?Specifically for Cisco and Microsoft, When would it be a good time to apply ? (for example:after I have my A+, Net+ , and CCNA)
  • DagistoDagisto Posts: 25Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Keven,

    I would advise you to start with ITIL V3 Foundation to get an understanding what happens within the IT Infrastructure of an company. And get a good basis in an Operating System and build from there on up.

    I started at a skilled servicedesk(2008 ), 2nd line on-site engineer, System Admin, Operational sys admin and now using this foundation to build up a career within Information Security as a Security Analyst(2013).

    It is good to have an idea to where you see yourself within the coming 5 years and set up a solid PDP to bring you where you want to be. As you still need to start within IT and your possibly do not have a clear idea what the possibilities are. Start at the basis as a first line support and start networking with the other IT departments to see what their work consists of.
  • BokehBokeh Posts: 1,636Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    [QUOTE=with stories from folks who got into IT for the money, glory, and girls (yeah right) just to realize later on that it wasn't what they thought. Just make sure you can deal with the long hours, constant learning, and all the other issues that may come along. I maybe wrong, but I'm getting a vibe that you are putting too much emphasis on the "good paying job." Wrong approach if you ask me.
    [/QUOTE]

    Wait, what? We were supposed to get girls?
  • goldenlightgoldenlight Posts: 378Member
    To help you figure out what career you want to persue in IT I would Check Onet online a career base data website. Shows the jobs with the brightest outlook.

    I also encourage you to check out the A+ forum here for suggested study material.
    The Only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it keep looking. Don't settle - Steve Jobs
  • redzredz CISSP-ISSAP, ISSEP, ISSMP, CAP (& others) Posts: 265Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    keven702 wrote: »
    Yea, Im not looking for a hand me out and a 100k job off the bat. By decent I'm talking around 50-70k. Thanks for the help so far guys.

    That's the problem, 50 is high for your first year(s). Based on a summary Dice search for entry level IT jobs in NYC, a bachelors in IT, or 1-4 years experience, would net you between 35-40k for your first year. Of course, I only saw two jobs with rates posted when I checked, so it's a small sample area.

    Either way, get a job as soon as possible, regardless of growth opportunities for it or pay, as long as it's enough for you to exist. ITIL & A+ is a nice in for a helpdesk job, and neither are difficult but will both provide a solid base of understanding and compliment future educational endeavors well. Then get N+ & CCNA and get a new job.

    Either a CCNA or MCSA are going to open a lot of doors for you, but you'll need experience to back it up. I would recommend trying to get experience as soon as possible.

    Bokeh wrote: »
    Wait, what? We were supposed to get girls?
    Q1 2013 rev to base IT job benefits. Still often takes artful negotiation. Wink.

    EDIT:
    keven702 wrote: »
    I looked online for jobs but in the job description i don't see CCNA or MCSA as a requirement . Do you guys know the name of the jobs I should apply for ?Specifically for Cisco and Microsoft, When would it be a good time to apply ? (for example:after I have my A+, Net+ , and CCNA)
    Go to www.dice.com, search for things like CCNA or MCSA. I popped 120 hits for CCNA in NYC, and 16 for MCSA (83 for MCSE).
  • keven702keven702 Posts: 6Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    So my current plan is get A+, ITIL, NET+, CCNA then apply for a Noc job.

    Please criticize my plan .
  • keven702keven702 Posts: 6Member ■□□□□□□□□□
  • wstaurtillwstaurtill Posts: 1Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Before getting into any field you must ensure your personal interests in that field. IT is a good career option, But whenever you go for any IT job you will need training which is provided by IT companies itself. I was fortunate to start my career in IT with spyrel, it is the best company i have ever worked with and i would also recommend this to you. They teach well in project management and execution you will have a great time there.
  • Snow.brosSnow.bros Posts: 832Member ■■■■□□□□□□
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