Appropriate Certifcation to Break into the IT field

New2ITinCaliNew2ITinCali Senior MemberSan Francisco Bay AreaMember Posts: 184 ■■■□□□□□□□
Hi All. I've been trying desperately to break into the I.T. field with no luckicon_sad.gif I've been on over 10 interviews. I have my Bachelors in Business with a concentration in Information Technology Management and I completed a 6 month internship, so I have that under my belt as well. I really want to focus on Software Development (SQL, ASP.NET, C++) because that is where my experience is. I would consider myself intermediate though, not proficient in the areas listed above (SQL, ASP.NET, C++). I am willing to work in network, help desk or anything IT related at this point. I currently work in accounting, and have been an accountant for over 7 years now. I'm ready for this change. What certifications would any of you recommend I get to break into the field?.. Thanks for everyone's help in advance! icon_wink.gif

Comments

  • antielvisantielvis Member Posts: 285 ■■■□□□□□□□
    My immediate thought was that you'd had 10 interviews and didn't land the job. Therefore, I'd say perhaps it's what's happening in the interview? Are you nervous? You being willing to do anything could be seen as "indecisive" by a recruiter or HR, especially from a guy who is trying to change careers. It's not about you getting in the door man, it's about what's happening once you're in the door (10 interviews is damn good).

    I would lay out where you want to go in IT, set it out and short, mid term and long term goals and tell that to the interviewer. I'd also recommend to make it clear you WANT a change of career & you've given thought to it. Good luck.
  • docricedocrice Member Posts: 1,706 ■■■■■■■■■■
    If you want to go into software development, you should be able to show proof of your work. Do you have a portfolio of applications you have created and made available for all to see and inspect (such as open source repositories)?

    No certification is a ticket into the IT field. Some places may have minimal requirements, but nothing really serves as a real qualifier. There are a lot more variables in play than an exam and a passing score. There are hiring managers who put credibility into certifications, and many that don't.

    Why do you consider yourself intermediate-level when you have no actual work experience in the field?
    Hopefully-useful stuff I've written: http://kimiushida.com/bitsandpieces/articles/
  • New2ITinCaliNew2ITinCali Senior Member San Francisco Bay AreaMember Posts: 184 ■■■□□□□□□□
    docrice wrote: »
    If you want to go into software development, you should be able to show proof of your work. Do you have a portfolio of applications you have created and made available for all to see and inspect (such as open source repositories)?

    No certification is a ticket into the IT field. Some places may have minimal requirements, but nothing really serves as a real qualifier. There are a lot more variables in play than an exam and a passing score. There are hiring managers who put credibility into certifications, and many that don't.

    Why do you consider yourself intermediate-level when you have no actual work experience in the field?

    Well, maybe I exaggerated a bit. I do have some pretty good experience. During my internship I worked on a development project with the database administrator, and I helped maintain the intranet. I also worked with Microsoft SQL, and I completed Oracle SQL coursework in school. It seems that every interview I go on, which are ALL ENTRY-LEVEL btw, want the candidates to have extensive experience. Unfortunately, I don't have that, so it's been very difficult. I'm a horrible interview to begin with because I get very nervous, and to top it off I don't have a load of experience. I just wish someone would give me a chance.
  • New2ITinCaliNew2ITinCali Senior Member San Francisco Bay AreaMember Posts: 184 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Yes, you're right. I do get nervous. Also, I never just present myself as being desperate or wanting anything I.T. related. I view the job description, then I tailor my resume to some of the specifics they are looking for, and from there I relate my skills, and knowledge to what they're looking for. I even hired a career coach. She said everything on my resume looked good, and she believes its my interviewing skills that I have to work on.
  • paul78paul78 Member Posts: 3,016 ■■■■■■■■■■
    If you are getting at least 10 interviews, you have the right resume which highlights your experience and credentials to peak a potential employers interest. That's usually the first hurdle to breaking into IT - so congratulations on that first step. That's actually not bad.

    The next step is the interview process which it sounds like you are nervous about. Do you have any friends that would be willing to practice interviewing with? That may help you get more comfortable.

    Try googling for ideas and articles on where you may be weak in your interview skills - I also came across this web site which I thought was fascinating - I only gave the site a cursory look - but perhaps it can help you - https://practice.interviewstream.com/default.aspx

    Good luck!
  • antielvisantielvis Member Posts: 285 ■■■□□□□□□□
    To the OP

    I'm not sure of your financial situation, but have you given thought to taking some courses in public speaking or personal development? I know many approach an interview as it being about selling yourself and that's somewhat the truth. But perhaps more important is your ability to engage someone in a conversation. It's about confidence in yourself & being comfortable interacting with others. It's not sales in the sense of you saying "look at me, I'm so good" it's more subtle.

    I used to be a self employed IT consultant so I had to go out and get business. I'm a LOUSY sales guy, but I took some lessons to learn how to speak publicly & learned how to engage people. What I learned is that the abilty to engage another person is far more important than selling yourself and really its that ability to engage is what sells you. If you can't afford a course or a book well then use the world around you. When you buy a coffee, engage the person taking your money or the person behind you in line. See how they react. If you screw up and make an ass of yourself, go to the Starbucks up the street next time and try again icon_wink.gif
  • MSSoftieMSSoftie Security+, ITIL v3 Foundations, MCSE Cloud Platform Infrastructure Charlotte NC areaMember Posts: 190 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Couple of suggestions for you. First, find any local computer professionals or user group in your area if you can. Great for networking. It sounds like your resume is fine but need work on the interview as noted before. I would recommend finding a ToastMasters group in your area. It is perfect for this type of situation and beyond. Let them know what you want to improve and I am sure that you will find a very helpful and supportive audience.
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