4 yrs Degrees

monkey1300monkey1300 Posts: 2Member ■□□□□□□□□□
Hi, I am new to this forum and I am new to IT.

I am currently major in Network Administratar and Network Engineer, which are only a 2 yrs degree. I was wondering is there any 4 yrs degree for Networking? I searched around all the University around the area I lived, but none of them offer anything like that.

Thanks
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Comments

  • garv221garv221 Posts: 1,914Member
    Universities have picked up alot more 4 yr. networking programs in the last 3-4 years. Where do you live?
  • monkey1300monkey1300 Posts: 2Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Sacramento, CA
  • int80hint80h Posts: 84Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Networking is neither broad enough or complicated enough to facilitate a 4 year degree. If you want a 4 year degree you'll have to go into EE, CompE, CS, etc.
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Posts: 4,884Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    int80h wrote:
    Networking is neither broad enough or complicated enough to facilitate a 4 year degree. If you want a 4 year degree you'll have to go into something more broad.

    I have to respectfully disagree. There are plenty of schools offering 4 year degrees in Comp Sci with a Netwoking emphasis, just as there are many Comp Sci degrees with a Programming emphasis. Not complicated enough? My friend, there is more to networking than Cat5, OSI and ping. If you think it's not complicated enough than go take the CCIE exam and start making 6 figures tomorrow. Seriously, there are indeed many sub-specialties in networking. How about a 4-year degree in Information System Security? That's just a piece of the networking pie of which there are many speciality tracks.

    Maybe its just the semantics. When he says "networking" I think "System Administration". Maybe I misunderstood the topic?

    Mark
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • rarossraross Posts: 48Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    int80h wrote:
    Networking is neither broad enough or complicated enough to facilitate a 4 year degree. If you want a 4 year degree you'll have to go into EE, CompE, CS, etc.

    I agree, infact I have stated this before and got flamed to all hell. People do not like hearing the truth. Computer science is strictly programming and algorithmic design, if there is a school that says otherwise, it is not accredited.
  • jaeusmjaeusm Posts: 42Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Networking is neither broad enough or complicated enough to facilitate a 4 year degree. If you want a 4 year degree you'll have to go into EE, CompE, CS, etc.
    I agree, infact I have stated this before and got flamed to all hell. People do not like hearing the truth.

    @ monkey1300:
    For future reference, you should consult Google before posting degree-related questions in this forum. Some of the less-informed members have a tendency to fabricate information. For starters:
    Purdue University offers a BS in Network Engineering Technology;
    Indiana Institute of Technology offers a BS in Networking.
  • RisingPhoenixRisingPhoenix Posts: 41Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I have a 4 year degree in Computer information systems which was a mixture of networking and programming. I had to take some basic programming classes like COBOL, but the majority of the classes were networking.
  • TeKniquesTeKniques OSCE, OSCP, CISSP, CISA, SSCP, MCSE (03), Security+, Network+, A+, Project+ Posts: 1,262Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    jaeusm wrote:
    Networking is neither broad enough or complicated enough to facilitate a 4 year degree. If you want a 4 year degree you'll have to go into EE, CompE, CS, etc.
    I agree, infact I have stated this before and got flamed to all hell. People do not like hearing the truth.

    @ monkey1300:
    For future reference, you should consult Google before posting degree-related questions in this forum. Some of the less-informed members have a tendency to fabricate information. For starters:
    Purdue University offers a BS in Network Engineering Technology;
    Indiana Institute of Technology offers a BS in Networking.

    I agree with what you said. To int80h and raross if you're not attending MIT or Harvard you are just not good enough. I'm basing this off their many posts putting down community colleges and people who attend online education, etc.
  • JuddJudd Posts: 132Member
    What topic on networking degrees would be appropriate without my comments? icon_wink.gif
    I was wondering is there any 4 yrs degree for Networking? I searched around all the University around the area I lived, but none of them offer anything like that.

    Four-year networking degrees are rare, I spoke with a few colleges offering these degrees, but after viewing the syllabus it was apparent that many were bloated with liberal arts classes to make up the 120 credits required for the B.S. Others threw in a few security classes and a few MIS classes that mirror the B.S.I.T.

    I'm afraid you will find that you would be repeating many classes you have already taken unless they award you transfer credit. In state schools would more then likely accept your credit for a 2+2 degree in IT or MIS and even Biz Admin if offered.

    I'm still curious about the attraction to Network degree and job related threads by programmers and computer engineers?? Although networking is very interesting, it's not nearly as glamorous as programming right? I mean the group of 25 programmers at my company get to sit and stare all day at their computer screens and never take breaks, they get to interact with the business systems folks every time there’s a bug in a program, and they have cool collections of soda cans and bottles on their desks, that is until those mean managers force them to throw it all away. And they are definitely the friendliest people in the company; always smiling, and boy are they in good shape! Fit as a fiddle! Why give up all of that for networking right?
  • RisingPhoenixRisingPhoenix Posts: 41Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Judd wrote:
    What topic on networking degrees would be appropriate without my comments? icon_wink.gif
    I was wondering is there any 4 yrs degree for Networking? I searched around all the University around the area I lived, but none of them offer anything like that.



    I'm still curious about the attraction to Network degree and job related threads by programmers and computer engineers?? Although networking is very interesting, it's not nearly as glamorous as programming right? I mean the group of 25 programmers at my company get to sit and stare all day at their computer screens and never take breaks, they get to interact with the business systems folks every time there’s a bug in a program, and they have cool collections of soda cans and bottles on their desks, that is until those mean managers force them to throw it all away. And they are definitely the friendliest people in the company; always smiling, and boy are they in good shape! Fit as a fiddle! Why give up all of that for networking right?


    Best post I think i've ever seen on the subject LMAO!
  • JuddJudd Posts: 132Member
    Best post I think i've ever seen on the subject LMAO!
    icon_lol.gif The programmers in college seemed fine, but the majority of programmers in the industry I've had the pleasure of working with pretty much stay pissed off...

    Not sure why, perhaps it’s because network folks monitor their apps on the network and quickly recognize their bugs such as half open TCP connections... Or writing an app and forgetting all about that whole security thing... They love it when we remind them of that one!

    ...maybe we will never really know.
  • DarklyWiseDarklyWise Posts: 75Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    www.fhsu.edu/int

    4 Year degree in Information Networking and Telecommunications with a major in Computer Networking and Telecommunications.

    As part of the core, you have to write the CCNA. FHSU is a Regionally Accredited school and rather affordable.

    I would suggest you check out www.degreeinfo.com and hit the forum section - that's where I found FHSU and I couln't be happier :)
    A being Darkly Wise and Rudely Great
  • pcrepairguypcrepairguy Posts: 7Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    It is rather a waste of time and money getting a 4 year degree for networking. As far as I know they only teach you the foundations of networking, and you can even take that at a trade/training schools around. Colleges and Universities don't even teach in depth Microsoft, Novell, Cisco etc. for a 4 year degree. That's just my opinion.
    Why read "Impossible" Just read it "I M Possible" -- A.I. (not Iverson;)
  • skully93skully93 Posts: 321Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I think you could go either way. I think a degree would allow you to learn pick up other networking concepts much faster.

    However, you have to figure even if you get your CCNA, it would expire within a couple of years of you graduating at the most.

    The reason I chose not to go for a degree was the ability to learn at my own pace for certs, and that I have some experience. Plus I don't have a year to spend on social studies and english credits (which would actually be a lot of fun, honestly).

    I still think it can be done either way. I've seen people with and without degrees be successful, and I've seen both be total tards in the field. It depends on the person.
    I do not have a psychiatrist and I do not want one, for the simple reason that if he listened to me long enough, he might become disturbed.

    -- James Thurber
  • JuddJudd Posts: 132Member
    skully93 wrote:
    I still think it can be done either way. I've seen people with and without degrees be successful, and I've seen both be total tards in the field. It depends on the person.
    It also depends on career goals and cirmsustances.

    It's becoming rare to get a position in IT without formal education. Remember that you have to compete for jobs. Employers may look at you as a long term investment and consider if you have invested in your education. This also translates to career goals. Without education, you will eventually hit a promotional ceiling, unless there are special cirmsustances with the employer.

    It's good that you will have the 2-year degree based on current industry trends. If you wish to stay in networking, getting a few certs might be a good idea.
  • jaeusmjaeusm Posts: 42Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    It is rather a waste of time and money getting a 4 year degree for networking. As far as I know they only teach you the foundations of networking, and you can even take that at a trade/training schools around. Colleges and Universities don't even teach in depth Microsoft, Novell, Cisco etc. for a 4 year degree. That's just my opinion.

    It really doesn't make sense for a university to teach any "Microsoft, Novell, Cisco, etc." Universities offer degrees, which are not in any way like certifications. If universities only offered in-depth "Microsoft, Novell, Cisco, etc", your degree would be worthless in a few years because the technology would change. So, your opinion is correct, but you should investigate the purpose of four-year university degrees.
  • RisingPhoenixRisingPhoenix Posts: 41Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I'm probably going to get massively flammed for this post, but here I go.

    Most of the people on this forum seem to only hold certifications and not a college degree. I do hold both a 4 year college degree plus a few certifications. Most of you are right when you say that a 4 year college degree in a computing or networking area is lacking. You are right, it is lacking most of the time. However, in this computer business job security is a REALLY hard thing to obtain. I like the feeling that I will always hold a university degree no matter what it is. If the computer industry starts to go under I can always switch jobs to something else without having to start at the bottom. Just by going to college, even though I had to take electives that had nothing to do with anything computer related, that is still knowledge and experience I didnt have before I took the class. I like the fact that not only can I design a network for a business with my computer certifications, I can also understand how the business works by using my university business degree. I've always wanted to do consulting for business companies, and with a business degree and certifications I can do just that. Overall, I think getting more education is worth it no matter what it is. Almost every industry in the world uses computers in some way, shape, or form and it just so happens that those industries also like college degrees.
  • Many colleges offer a degree such as CIS or CS etc, but have a specialization aspect to it, such as CS networking technologies or CS information security etc. And definately, community colleges and online schools have some of the best curriculums for IT related fields around. Never underestimate them.
  • nuglobenuglobe Posts: 190Member
    Uh, getting a BS or BA in Business Management is one of the worse degrees you can get for 4 years of education (minus maybe Sloan, Harvard, Worton). If the IT industry drops out, there will be a flood of BA Business folk who were managing those companies, and just because you got the BA -- and spent the last n-years doing something completely unrealed-- doesn't give you a step up. If anything you would be in the same boat.

    One of the first rules of having to downsize is to cut the excess management blout (both BAs and MBAs).

    Not trying to be an ass icon_wink.gif , but you can step down off the horse.
    GenshiroGuide: My blog about things I found useful. Now with videos. :)
  • RisingPhoenixRisingPhoenix Posts: 41Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    nuglobe wrote:
    Uh, getting a BS or BA in Business Management is one of the worse degrees you can get for 4 years of education (minus maybe Sloan, Harvard, Worton). If the IT industry drops out, there will be a flood of BA Business folk who were managing those companies, and just because you got the BA -- and spent the last n-years doing something completely unrealed-- doesn't give you a step up. If anything you would be in the same boat.

    One of the first rules of having to downsize is to cut the excess management blout (both BAs and MBAs).

    Not trying to be an ass icon_wink.gif , but you can step down off the horse.

    i'm just giving an opinion. I feel the more education you can get the more it will benefit you down the road, and it may just open some doors you never expected.
  • TeKniquesTeKniques OSCE, OSCP, CISSP, CISA, SSCP, MCSE (03), Security+, Network+, A+, Project+ Posts: 1,262Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    nuglobe: There is no statistical data to back up what you are saying. I think that if you hold a 4 year degree you will have a better chance to find another job before the guy without one regardless of what the degree is.

    In fact, most job descriptions I have read always say "BS/BA degree or equivalent". They don't even specify or to me really care what your degree is in.
  • RisingPhoenixRisingPhoenix Posts: 41Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    nuglobe wrote:
    If the IT industry drops out, there will be a flood of BA Business folk who were managing those companies, and just because you got the BA -- and spent the last n-years doing something completely unrealed-- doesn't give you a step up. If anything you would be in the same boat.

    I'm still trying to figure that quote out. How would I be in the same boat. Just my college degree would help to seperate me from the heard, but what do you think a college degree and some certifications would do? The way i've seen, if a job calls for a college degree and you apply and dont have a college degree your resume isnt even looked at and is put in the rejection pile. I think I understand what you are trying to say in your post nuglobe, but if you could elaborate a little more on what you mean and maybe give some examples that would be great.
  • draineydrainey Posts: 261Member
    I know it's fun to bash management, but quite a few companies are starting to require a 4 year degree of some sort in order to advance into the managerial ranks. So I have to agree with RisingPhoenix that more education can't hurt and neither can a degree. That's not to say that anyone should feel obligated to go get one, but if it's what you want then go for it. I have around 75 total credit hours and would love to finish my degree if I could find an affordable online program that's work the work(no univeristies close enough that offer night classes in IT), but in the meantime I guess I'll just keeping getting those certs.

    CWNA is next. Then maybe CCNA. Unless I find an online program first of course.
    The irony truly is strange that you're the only one you can change. -- Anthony Gomes
  • draineydrainey Posts: 261Member
    FHSU huh? thanks for the tip DarklyWise. Hays isn't that far from Salina.
    The irony truly is strange that you're the only one you can change. -- Anthony Gomes
  • nuglobenuglobe Posts: 190Member
    Yes it will make you stand out from the other IT people, but as you mentioned the IT filled collapsed. So I assumed that you would be trying to get a job in some other field. As I mentioned there would be a flood of BAs in Management, as well as a whole bunch of MBAs do to the recent cuts in IT (which mid and low range management are always the first to go).

    Either way experience has always been the driving factor in any job application. Well, unless they are looking to take on entry level people... but that is rare during a time with a slow economy.

    TeKniques: Not only is it logical, there are supporting studies and leading economist that have published papers on these type of issues.

    I go to MIT and in both my management class and economics class this issue has been brought up. Trust me a lot of people ask this question at this school... its $40,000/year if you don't get aid. Many want to make sure they are getting what they pay for.
    GenshiroGuide: My blog about things I found useful. Now with videos. :)
  • moss12moss12 Posts: 222Banned
    nuglobe: There is no statistical data to back up what you are saying. I think that if you hold a 4 year degree you will have a better chance to find another job before the guy without one regardless of what the degree is.

    In fact, most job descriptions I have read always say "BS/BA degree or equivalent". They don't even specify or to me really care what your degree is in.


    So my Architecture degree will count ? I can go to IT any time if i change my mind by doing CCNA ? :D
  • Kevin.SmithKevin.Smith Posts: 33Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Employers love the fact that an applicant has a degree. But most of the time experience will be the winning factor over education, but not always. I hardly was looked at with an MCSA and no experience. I was lucky enough to get the job I have now, by having an interview the same day I took my last test, actualy at the test center.
    WIP: A+ Essentials
  • DarklyWiseDarklyWise Posts: 75Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    NP drainey icon_smile.gif

    To the poster who said that the CCNA expires after two years even with a Degree - of course it expires, but ideally you move onto the next logical step ( CCNP / CCSP / CCDP )...

    Is a degree useful? Most certainly it is - I do not know of a person who has a degree and complains about it, though the opposite is very true. Yes, at the rate technology is moving, some material will be outdated, however not all of it. TCP/IP is TCP/IP and will stay TCP/IP - hence TCP/IP illustrated is still one of the best TCP/IP books out there ( or Volumes, if you will ).

    What's after a Bachelors degree? Well, you can get a 2nd bachelors degree in less than 1/2 the time (since most of the general electives would have been covered already) or you can move onto a Masters degree.

    An ideal combination is a degree along with Certifications. Years ago experience alone got my my 1st IT job, though that has changed - if you're trying to get your foot in the door, experience alone will not open nearly as many doors as you'd like...
    A being Darkly Wise and Rudely Great
  • nuglobenuglobe Posts: 190Member
    What's after a Bachelors degree? Well, you can get a 2nd bachelors degree in less than 1/2 the time (since most of the general electives would have been covered already) or you can move onto a Masters degree.

    Most schools only allow the classes to be used in one sitting. Say if you want to double major in CS and Math. I haven't seen many schools that will allow you to come back and use a previous degree toward the same type of degree in a different field. Would be nice though lol. :D
    GenshiroGuide: My blog about things I found useful. Now with videos. :)
  • jaeusmjaeusm Posts: 42Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Most schools only allow the classes to be used in one sitting. Say if you want to double major in CS and Math. I haven't seen many schools that will allow you to come back and use a previous degree toward the same type of degree in a different field. Would be nice though lol.

    Most schools will evaluate the classes you took in a previous degree program, as well as the number of years that have passed. If some required classes are outdated, you'll be required to make those up. However, some classes, like Calculus, usually aren't updated too often icon_wink.gif .

    That said, if you already have a BS, why get another? Go for an MS.
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