Being let go Before 90 days. How Do you Bounce Back?

NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Posts: 1,400Member ■■■■■■■■□□
Being let go Before 90 days.

I did find a job at a MSP that I really enjoyed.

I was 30 days in and I was let go.

I started on the Service Desk as a Level 1.

Then one day one of the guys pulled me off the service desk to help him with a PC refresh project for the entire company.

Well we lost a cleint and things seemed to really slow down.

The project was tough at times, because it was just me and aonther guy.

So my superviosr and the owner brought me into the conference room, and said they're letting me go.

They said they see struggling. ( they were vague when they said this) They mentioned how I set up my supervisors computer. I used to many cords for the monitor. However, I made sure his computer worked before I left.

Then they mentioned that the guy that trained me for two days, saw me struggling. No one said they see me struggling. to my face.

Infact what is really weird is we had a service meeting a week ago and my superviosr said it's slow, and they are not letting me go.

Well at the end they said I'm a nice person, and feel free to apply again when I have more experience.

Also, they said they don't have time to train me. What was weird is I was let go right after the project was finished.


How do I bounce back from this?

Do all MSP want level one's to actually be level 2 and pay level one rates?

It's hard because I had a lot of recuiters that wanted to work with me before taking this job.

Also, I did turn down a temp job for this one.
When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

--Alexander Graham Bell,
American inventor
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Comments

  • techfiendtechfiend Posts: 1,481Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    I'm realizing MN isn't compensating IT as well as they used to. I also know an unusually high amount of unemployed IT workers and not many openings. Supply surpassing demand?I wouldn't put the position on your resume. It sounds like a potential financial issue and you were the cheapest to let go. I'd use their reason as fuel to show the next employer you are better than they thought.
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  • UncleBUncleB Posts: 417Member
    From what you describe it sounds like 1 of 2 things happened here:
    1 - they no longer need the headcount and since you are easy to get rid of and they have least investment in you, then you are first to go.

    2 - you didn't gel with the team and they used an excuse to let you go - maybe they had someone else in mind.

    The company should have set you objectives in the first few days that would be scheduled for 30, 60 and 90 day targets then they have 2 weekly meetings to review your progress against these and make sure you are getting the support needed to achieve them. If you don't reach them because of a basic lack of competency then they have grounds to let you go - and it should highlight to you where your failings were to help you develop in future.

    Unfortunately most managers overcommit themselves and don't make time to manage their staff, leading to situations like yours.

    Either they made a poor hire (the managers fault) or you were not given clear enough objectives, training and support (again down to the manager to organise) so you can see where the blame is poining here.

    Make sure you get a letter from HR that clearly states the reasons for the termination as a short spell in a company is often a red flag to future employers and it is good to have this as a way to mitigate it.

    It's happened to me (well I found the manager of a public sector company was embezzling company funds and was let go before I could report him - but amazing what an anonymous tip to the press can yield, especially with proof) and you just have to mark it up to experience and get even better at working to be a part of the team when you join the next place and ask for objectives and reviews to both prove yourself and cover your back.

    Don't worry that you were at fault too much and don't hold a grudge against the company - it gets unhealthy and is simply not worth the energy. Look forward to making yourself better and pity the fools who lost you as part of the company - it is their loss.
  • thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+; CCNA R&S; CCNP R&S Posts: 908Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    They lost a client and things slowed down. It’s pretty obvious why they’re letting you go even though they decided to frame it as an issue with you when it’s really an issue with the company.
  • mbarrettmbarrett Posts: 397Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I did find a job at a MSP that I really enjoyed.

    How do I bounce back from this?

    It's hard because I had a lot of recuiters that wanted to work with me before taking this job.

    Also, I did turn down a temp job for this one.

    They lost a client, and they needed a reason to let people go. It sounds like you were the new guy, and did not have enough time to find your niche on the team. Nothing wrong with that - it's just business. I'm sorry to hear it didn't end well, hopefully something else turns up soon. I wouldn't overthink it too much. The fact that they pulled you off the Help Desk and tried to train you for something else is not your fault. it sounds like it might be a smaller company so they probably have limited resources, and they were probably looking for something to keep you on.

    It's good that you had other promising leads before you tried the MSP job, so you know that you are already marketable. That does not change, because one company was not able to perform well enough in their own business to be able to keep all their employees.

    It's also good that you found something you liked while you were there - that means it wasn't a waste of time, you might be able to find another job where you are able to do these things.
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youPosts: 2,717Mod Mod
    Shoot, I was let go 3 DAYS into a job. You do bounce back because even though you don't feel great about this now, things happen for a reason. Hang in there.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • EANxEANx Posts: 1,078Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Best job I had, the one that really propelled my career appeared a couple of weeks after I was fired for something that wasn't my fault. There was a lack of culture fit and honestly, the job wasn't where I wanted to be (although I did my job). I never would have been looking for that job had I not been punted.

    How do you bounce back? Every event has an opportunity for growth. Based on everything you said, they weren't in a good position but to be fair, if you were Mr. Awesome they would have done everything they could to keep you around. Figure out what you need to be the last person standing after a round of layoffs. You don't need to tell us but were there areas you struggled with? If so, work on them.
  • volfkhatvolfkhat Posts: 947Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    thomas_ wrote: »
    They lost a client and things slowed down. It’s pretty obvious why they’re letting you go even though they decided to frame it as an issue with you when it’s really an issue with the company.

    ^ Nailed it.
  • clarkincnetclarkincnet Posts: 257Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    You bounce back because what other option is there? Work at McDonalds (not that I don't enjoy myself a juicy Big Mac from time to time)? Seriously - don't let one experience or the opinions of a few people define how you see yourself.

    Better question to ask - how will this experience help me?
    "Distrust and caution are the parents of security" - Benjamin Franklin

    Have: CISSP, CISM, CRISC, CGEIT, ITIL-F
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Posts: 1,400Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    thomas_ wrote: »
    They lost a client and things slowed down. It’s pretty obvious why they’re letting you go even though they decided to frame it as an issue with you when it’s really an issue with the company.

    Good Point Thank you!!
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Posts: 1,400Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    techfiend wrote: »
    I'm realizing MN isn't compensating IT as well as they used to. I also know an unusually high amount of unemployed IT workers and not many openings. Supply surpassing demand?I wouldn't put the position on your resume. It sounds like a potential financial issue and you were the cheapest to let go. I'd use their reason as fuel to show the next employer you are better than they thought.


    Thank you for your comment! I won't put this job on my resume. It does feel like a financial issue. I was lowest paid employee as I know. I am going ot use this as fuel to show my next employer that I'm better than they thought.
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Posts: 2,476Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    They said they see struggling. ( they were vague when they said this) They mentioned how I set up my supervisors computer. I used to many cords for the monitor. However, I made sure his computer worked before I left.
    Hard to say, usually it's a combination of things from my experience. They probably weren't impressed with you AND what made them act on this was the loss client. Most likely if the client would of stayed on with the MSP they would of overlooked your skills, at least that is my previous experience.


    Then they mentioned that the guy that trained me for two days, saw me struggling. No one said they see me struggling. to my face.
    Right or wrong it sounds like the senior guy wasn't impressed and went to management. It sounds like he has their ear and they listened to hjim

    Infact what is really weird is we had a service meeting a week ago and my superviosr said it's slow, and they are not letting me go.
    Welcome to IT. I've seen public awards to people in a conference setting, two months later they are let go. Talk about one extreme to the other.

    Well at the end they said I'm a nice person, and feel free to apply again when I have more experience.
    That's very important they recognized you as a nice person, at the end of the day that is the most important even if it doesn't feel like it now.

    Also, they said they don't have time to train me. What was weird is I was let go right after the project was finished.
    Another not so subtle hint that you weren't meeting their expectations.


    I am currently going through something like this now. I started off doing great, and had trouble finishing a large SQL in a short period of time. I suggested we get another set of eyes on it and now I am getting the silent treatment. Oh well I'll keep working until something happens or nothing happens.

    Either way good luck in your search!
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Posts: 1,400Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    UncleB wrote: »
    From what you describe it sounds like 1 of 2 things happened here:
    1 - they no longer need the headcount and since you are easy to get rid of and they have least investment in you, then you are first to go.

    2 - you didn't gel with the team and they used an excuse to let you go - maybe they had someone else in mind.

    The company should have set you objectives in the first few days that would be scheduled for 30, 60 and 90 day targets then they have 2 weekly meetings to review your progress against these and make sure you are getting the support needed to achieve them. If you don't reach them because of a basic lack of competency then they have grounds to let you go - and it should highlight to you where your failings were to help you develop in future.

    Unfortunately most managers overcommit themselves and don't make time to manage their staff, leading to situations like yours.

    Either they made a poor hire (the managers fault) or you were not given clear enough objectives, training and support (again down to the manager to organise) so you can see where the blame is poining here.

    Make sure you get a letter from HR that clearly states the reasons for the termination as a short spell in a company is often a red flag to future employers and it is good to have this as a way to mitigate it.

    It's happened to me (well I found the manager of a public sector company was embezzling company funds and was let go before I could report him - but amazing what an anonymous tip to the press can yield, especially with proof) and you just have to mark it up to experience and get even better at working to be a part of the team when you join the next place and ask for objectives and reviews to both prove yourself and cover your back.

    Don't worry that you were at fault too much and don't hold a grudge against the company - it gets unhealthy and is simply not worth the energy. Look forward to making yourself better and pity the fools who lost you as part of the company - it is their loss.


    Thank you for your comment!

    I think it was number one.

    They did say they would give me a good reference and they would hire me again if I had more training.

    I got a letter saying employee separation. Verbally they told me the reasons, however on the paper it says" didn't meet expectations"


    They did change management roles.


    One of the guys on our team became a lead and took over all of the reviews and such.

    I really wish they would have came to me and said hey you're not meeting x or y requirement....how can we help you?
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youPosts: 2,717Mod Mod
    Thank you for your comment!

    I think it was number one.

    They did say they would give me a good reference and they would hire me again if I had more training.

    I got a letter saying employee separation. Verbally they told me the reasons, however on the paper it says" didn't meet expectations"


    They did change management roles.


    One of the guys on our team became a lead and took over all of the reviews and such.

    I really wish they would have came to me and said hey you're not meeting x or y requirement....how can we help you?

    Sounds like a screwed up company. Learn from this and move on
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • YesOffenseYesOffense Posts: 83Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    A bit of a blessing there. For one they're giving you a good reference, you don't have to tell recruiters anything but the truth which was you were laid off because the work slowed, you can take that experience and build. Also not sure you want to work somewhere that doesn't give feedback or take the time to mentor and mold a new Level 1 tech, that's when it's needed most. "Need more training"? that was their job! it's level 1 for christ's sake, not a senior role. Unless there were really other underlying issues they didn't feel like talking to you about (hygiene, chemistry etc,). Do assess everything and take away the right lessons from this, there's no time to sulk or be in your feelings, time to move on.
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Posts: 1,400Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    mbarrett wrote: »
    They lost a client, and they needed a reason to let people go. It sounds like you were the new guy, and did not have enough time to find your niche on the team. Nothing wrong with that - it's just business. I'm sorry to hear it didn't end well, hopefully something else turns up soon. I wouldn't overthink it too much. The fact that they pulled you off the Help Desk and tried to train you for something else is not your fault. it sounds like it might be a smaller company so they probably have limited resources, and they were probably looking for something to keep you on.

    It's good that you had other promising leads before you tried the MSP job, so you know that you are already marketable. That does not change, because one company was not able to perform well enough in their own business to be able to keep all their employees.

    It's also good that you found something you liked while you were there - that means it wasn't a waste of time, you might be able to find another job where you are able to do these things.

    I can honestly say I loved going to work everyday.

    The project wasn't fun, because it seemed like the sky was falling everyday. I have done projects before and this one was really rushed.

    I felt that I was losing all of my service desk training.
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Posts: 1,400Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Thank you guys for all your comments!!

    I will leave this job off my resume. I think there is a PC refresh project I can do for a short time.

    Do I mention this job to recruiters? If not I might have a employment gap.
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youPosts: 2,717Mod Mod
    No, don't mention the job.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • mbarrettmbarrett Posts: 397Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Do I mention this job to recruiters? If not I might have a employment gap.

    You can leave it off, unless you think there's some good experience/knowledge that you gained, that you might want to apply in a future job.
    Be prepared to explain either way - leaving it out of your resume probably won't hurt, but some HR people like to ask anyway. Since it sounds like something related to the the company's downsizing process, it should be pretty straightforward to explain to anyone who asks.
  • boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Posts: 394Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Honestly look at it as an opportunity to get better and grow.
    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Posts: 2,476Member ■■■■■■■■■□
    Sounds like a screwed up company. Learn from this and move on

    It's an MSP, of course it is...... ;)
  • yoba222yoba222 Posts: 1,057Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    They said they see struggling. ( they were vague when they said this) They mentioned how I set up my supervisors computer. I used to many cords for the monitor. However, I made sure his computer worked before I left.
    Hard to say, usually it's a combination of things from my experience. They probably weren't impressed with you AND what made them act on this was the loss client. Most likely if the client would of stayed on with the MSP they would of overlooked your skills, at least that is my previous experience.


    Then they mentioned that the guy that trained me for two days, saw me struggling. No one said they see me struggling. to my face.
    Right or wrong it sounds like the senior guy wasn't impressed and went to management. It sounds like he has their ear and they listened to hjim

    Infact what is really weird is we had a service meeting a week ago and my superviosr said it's slow, and they are not letting me go.
    Welcome to IT. I've seen public awards to people in a conference setting, two months later they are let go. Talk about one extreme to the other.

    Well at the end they said I'm a nice person, and feel free to apply again when I have more experience.
    That's very important they recognized you as a nice person, at the end of the day that is the most important even if it doesn't feel like it now.

    Also, they said they don't have time to train me. What was weird is I was let go right after the project was finished.
    Another not so subtle hint that you weren't meeting their expectations.


    I am currently going through something like this now. I started off doing great, and had trouble finishing a large SQL in a short period of time. I suggested we get another set of eyes on it and now I am getting the silent treatment. Oh well I'll keep working until something happens or nothing happens.

    Either way good luck in your search!


    This right here is my impression as well, though DatabaseHead worded things much more eloquently than I could have.
    2017: GCIH | LFCS
    2018: CySA+ | PenTest+ |CCNA CyberOps
    2019: VHL 20 boxes
    2020: OSCP | CISSP
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Posts: 6,844Mod Mod
    used to many cords for the monitor

    Am I the only one wondering what this means?

    OP, don't overthink it. This stuff happens and life goes on.
  • thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+; CCNA R&S; CCNP R&S Posts: 908Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    I’m guessing it means OP hooked up both hdmi and vga connections to the PC.
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youPosts: 2,717Mod Mod
    how can you use too many cords? either it fits or it doesn't. Stop obsessing and send out those resumes!!!icon_rolleyes.gif
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • NissekiNisseki Posts: 160Member
    I worked for a MSP, biggest mistake of my life and glad I left haha.
  • KyrakKyrak CISSP, PMP, MCSE CP&I, VCP5/6, CCNA R&S/Sec/Cyber Ops, ITIL, A+/N+/Sec+ Posts: 143Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    cyberguypr wrote: »
    Am I the only one wondering what this means?

    OP, don't overthink it. This stuff happens and life goes on.
    *Hooks up DVI Cable*
    Oh crap, no video
    *Hooks up VGA Cable now as well*
    Success!
    Looks like it is working to me. Next computer!

    And OP, don't put it on your resume and don't sweat it. Their loss but keep in mind the first 90 days is a probational period in some states (like Florida) so always make sure everything you do is as perfect as you can until you get past that point.
    Up next: On Break, but then maybe CCNA DC, CCNP DC, CISM, AWS SysOps Administrator
  • PantherPanther Posts: 114Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I realized you're the same OP on the other thread, about choosing the library work or the msp.

    Sorry this happened. I'm in the job market too, so I feel for you.

    Would you be able to share what you would do differently, in hindsight? If you want.

    Your thread and others on the net has me seriously interviewing them also instead of asking questions just to ask (which I was sort of doing).

    Some important ones I try to get in:

    What projects do you have going on?

    What is the "typical" day like for this role?

    What's the best candidate for this role? (I'll have to find how this is specifically asked, but it was something along this line.)

    (Obviously, once you're in it could still be a different story. But we do our best to interview them also.)

    Thanks for sharing your story, and helping others like myself. So, if/when I do land a job, I think I'll continue job searching, at least for a few weeks.
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Posts: 1,400Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Panther wrote: »
    I realized you're the same OP on the other thread, about choosing the library work or the msp.

    Sorry this happened. I'm in the job market too, so I feel for you.

    Would you be able to share what you would do differently, in hindsight? If you want.

    Yes, I can update this thread later this week or on the weekend, with a lessons learned/what would I do differently post.
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • blatiniblatini Posts: 285Member
    MSPs are ruthless man (I work for one now). You need to walk in there having a really good foundation and willingness to get your hands dirty in everything and anything. Sorry it happened.

    You should write down everything you did and were asked to do when you were there. Research it all and see what you could have done different. Get an understanding of what was said versus what was expected and you'll be better off next time
  • Cisco InfernoCisco Inferno Posts: 1,034Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    blatini wrote: »
    MSPs are ruthless man (I work for one now). You need to walk in there having a really good foundation and willingness to get your hands dirty in everything and anything. Sorry it happened.

    You should write down everything you did and were asked to do when you were there. Research it all and see what you could have done different. Get an understanding of what was said versus what was expected and you'll be better off next time

    I agree!

    Hang in there buddy. I was let go from an MSP after two months!! Some are usually more small, tech focused, and lack basic business management skills. And are probably too fast paced and time crunched to train you properly and keep you afloat.
    My MSP kept techs from one recruitment firm and sacked all the ones from another one. Apparently the first one, cut a deal with them and helped them pay their salaries. It's just how it is when a company loses a client; they sack the newest cheapest hires.

    You don't wanna work for an MSP anyways lol. Worst decision of my life. I don't regret my time there as I learned way more than anyone could in an enterprise environment. I got vmware exposure, server2012 exposure, and firewall exposure.

    If you want to return to an MSP in the future, make sure you're at a mid level. That way you can own projects, etc.

    Keep the job off the resume. If it was through a contract like mine was, I just list it with "(contract)" on my resume as people know contracts are short lived.
    2019 Goals
    CompTIA Linux+
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